Child Watch® Columns

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  • 06/24/11

    Child Watch® Column: "Giving Black Boys a Strong Start"

    When Shawn Dove was in sixth grade, the students at his New York City school were asked to decide which academic track they wanted to follow for the next two years. He decided to choose "major gym," just like the rest of his friends. But when he brought the form home to his single mother and said "Hey, Mom—can you sign this for me?," his mother said, "No—you're not going to major in gym! There's no future in gym. You're taking science and math."
  • 06/17/11

    Child Watch® Column: "Maternal Depression: Helping Mothers, Helping Children"

    Ellie Zuehlke and her husband had expected the birth of their long-awaited first child to be one of the happiest moments of their lives—until, somehow, it wasn't. Instead, Ellie experienced severe postpartum depression that left her unable to care for their newborn son. To thousands of mothers, Ellie Zuehlke's story will sound sadly familiar.
  • 06/10/11

    Child Watch® Column: "One Woman's Freedom Movement"

    The Rev. Dr. Anna Pauline "Pauli" Murray spent a lifetime challenging not only racial segregation, but systems of discrimination in all of their forms. Many students of American and African American literature and history know her as the author of acclaimed books like her fine memoir Proud Shoes—which told the extraordinary story of her childhood in her grandparents' North Carolina home and their family legacy of free Blacks, slaves, and slave owners—and her prizewinning poetry collection Dark Testament.
  • 06/03/11

    Child Watch® Column: "Remembering Dr. Benjamin E. Mays's Legacy"

    Dr. Benjamin Elijah Mays, who was born in 1894 to former slaves, was an adviser to Presidents, mentor of mentors like Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., lauded preacher and scholar, advocate for social justice, and the president of Morehouse College from 1940 to 1967.
  • 05/27/11

    Child Watch® Column: "Race to the Top-Early Learning Challenge"

    On May 25th, the Obama Administration announced a new Race to the Top challenge fund to identify and reward best practices in education—$500 million of the $700 million challenge is designed to improve the odds for the very youngest children. The Early Learning Challenge grant competition invites states to create comprehensive plans to develop and transform early learning systems for children from birth through prekindergarten to enable all children to start school ready to learn.
  • 05/20/11

    Child Watch® Column: "Fighting Cuts to Child Care"

    New York City parent Yvonne works as a home care attendant to help support her three-year-old son Darnell. While Yvonne is working, Darnell is enrolled at Franklin Square Head Start, part of Union Settlement in East Harlem, where he receives quality child care and is thriving. Earlier this year Yvonne received a letter saying Darnell would be dropped from the program on September 2, 2011. Yvonne can't afford a private preschool and she can't leave Darnell home alone. Without other affordable options, when September comes Yvonne will have nowhere for Darnell to go while she works.
  • 05/13/11

    Child Watch® Column: "Voting Rights Under Attack"

    At the signing of the historic Voting Rights Act on August 6, 1965 striking down the discriminatory practices many states had put in place to prohibit Blacks from exercising their right to vote, President Lyndon B. Johnson said, "Today is a triumph for freedom as huge as any victory that has ever been won on any battlefield."
  • 05/06/11

    Child Watch® Column: "Freedom Riders - A Living Legacy"

    "Boarding that Greyhound bus to travel through the heart of the Deep South, I felt good. I felt happy. I felt liberated. I was like a soldier in a nonviolent army. I was ready." Today, Congressman John Lewis is serving his twelfth term representing Georgia in the U.S. House of Representatives. But in May 1961 he was a twenty-one-year-old student leader from American Baptist College in Nashville who volunteered to join the interracial group traveling through the South by bus to test the recent Supreme Court decision banning segregation in interstate travel.
  • 04/29/11

    Child Watch® Column: "Judge Patricia Martin: Family Matters"

    The Honorable Patricia Martin, who serves as the Presiding Judge of the Child Protection Division of the Circuit Court of Cook County, Illinois, is the president-elect of the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges. In this key role she is devoted to helping change children's lives. She previously chaired the Supreme Court of Illinois Judicial Conference Study Committee on Juvenile Justice, and spent a decade as an assistant Cook County Public Defender.
  • 04/22/11

    Child Watch® Column: "Children's Health on the Chopping Block"

    Like many parents, California mother Anne-Marie Skinner knows "accidents happen." Her active, athletic teenagers Constance and Lucas are both involved in a number of extracurricular activities, and both have unfortunately suffered sports-related injuries that required serious medical care.
  • 04/15/11

    Child Watch® Column: "Dr. David French: Pioneering Physician"

    "This was a man who lived a life of urgency, but never an urgency in the service of self, but rather in the service of the society, of mankind, of others." So said Howard French at a memorial service for his father, Dr. David French who passed away March 31 at age 86. I was blessed to have him, his wife Carolyn, and their children as friends over many decades.
  • 04/08/11

    Child Watch® Column: "From Head Start to Harvard"

    The colors were brighter than any she had seen before. Shapes, letters, and lots and lots of colors adorned the walls; around the room, children worked together building high rises with colored blocks and "read" colorful picture books. "I had never seen so much color," Angelica Salazar recalls of her first days as a Head Start preschooler in Duarte, Calif. She remembers the discovery of library books and spending hours curled up on the reading rug.
  • 04/01/11

    Child Watch® Column: "Celebrating and Protecting Health Reform for Children"

    A year ago President Obama signed into law the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (the "Affordable Care Act"), guaranteeing access to health coverage for 32 million uninsured people in America including 95 percent of all children. Racial minorities are disproportionately uninsured today and the Affordable Care Act will have a particularly positive impact in communities of color if allowed to go forward.
  • 03/25/11

    Child Watch® Column: "Revisiting Marks, Mississippi"

    During her research for the Children's Defense Fund's recent report "Held Captive": Child Poverty in America, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Julia Cass visited the Mississippi Delta, New Orleans and Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and suburban Long Island, New York to profile three different kinds of child poverty. Her trip to Quitman County, Mississippi covered sadly familiar ground: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. visited the Black sharecropping community in Marks, the seat of Quitman County, in the summer of 1966 to preach at the funeral of a friend, and Marks was later chosen as the starting point of the mule train that left Mississippi for Washington, D.C. during the Poor People's Campaign.
  • 03/18/11

    Child Watch® Column: "Poor Children: Stranded at Sea"

    As Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Julia Cass prepared the recent Children's Defense Fund's report "Held Captive": Child Poverty in America, she traveled to the Mississippi Delta, the ravaged cities of New Orleans and Baton Rouge in Louisiana, and the birthplace of the suburban American dream in Long Island, New York to see several different sides of contemporary American child poverty. Despite the different circumstances children in these diverse communities faced, Cass found that there was something very familiar about the effects of child poverty everywhere she looked.
  • 03/11/11

    Child Watch® Column: "“The New Jim Crow”"

    "Jarvious Cotton cannot vote. Like his father, grandfather, great-grandfather, and great-great-grandfather, he has been denied the right to participate in our electoral democracy . . . Cotton's great-great-grandfather could not vote as a slave. His great-grandfather was beaten to death by the Ku Klux Klan for attempting to vote. His grandfather was prevented from voting by Klan intimidation. His father was barred from voting by poll taxes and literacy tests. Today, Jarvious Cotton cannot vote because he, like many black men in the United States, has been labeled a felon and is currently on parole."
  • 03/04/11

    Child Watch® Column: "Deamonte Driver's Continuing Legacy"

    Four years ago this February, an entire community was devastated in Prince George's County, Maryland, just outside Washington, D.C., when 12-year-old seventh grader Deamonte Driver died after complications from a tooth abscess. His mother Alyce, who worked at low-paying jobs, had searched for a dentist to treat Deamonte's toothache who would accept Medicaid, but she was unsuccessful.
  • 02/25/11

    Child Watch® Column: "A Call to Black Families"

    The distinguished theologian Howard Thurman once described an oak tree in his childhood yard with leaves that each autumn turned yellow and died but stayed on the branches all winter. Nothing—neither wind, storm, sleet, nor snow—dislodged these dead leaves from the apparently lifeless branches. Dr. Thurman came to understand that the business of the oak tree during the long winter was to hold on to the dead leaves before turning them loose in spring so that new buds—the growing edge—could begin to unfold.
  • 02/18/11

    Child Watch® Column: "Lighting a Successful Spark"

    "On your mark, get set, ready, go!" In the language of childhood, these words are an exciting invitation—and a signal that it's time to be at the starting line and prepared to take off in order to sprint to success. But what happens when children aren't ready for the most important race of their lives? Every year, four million children in America enter kindergarten, but as many as one in three won't be ready for school—and many of them will never catch up.
  • 02/11/11

    Child Watch® Column: "Young People Falling Behind Economically"

    While there is a lot of talk today about jobs, there has been far too little attention paid to the job prospects of young people. A new report prepared for the Children's Defense Fund shows young people have lost more ground economically than any other age group over the last three decades. Dr. Andrew Sum, professor and director of the Center for Labor Market Studies at Northeastern University, and his colleagues paint a grim economic picture for the futures of young workers and young families, and Black young people and young families fare the worst.
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