The State of America's Children® 2020

Child Hunger and Nutrition

>>>The State of America’s Children 2020 – Child Hunger and Nutrition Tables
The State of America’s Children 2020 – Child Hunger and Nutrition Tables2020-02-19T12:30:09-05:00

Table 10: Child Hunger and Obesity, 2017

Children Living in Food Insecure HouseholdsaChildren Ages 10-17 Overweight or Obesec
NumberPercentState RankbPercentState Rankd
Alabama243,88022.3%4533.2%39
Alaska34,69018.73423.85
Arizona348,55021.34324.17
Arkansas167,44023.64926.916
California1,638,43018.12930.127
Colorado177,36014.0727.720
Connecticut115,24015.51220.71
Delaware34,75017.02028.923
District of Columbia26,45021.235.6
Florida854,88020.44136.246
Georgia503,37020.03832.735
Hawaii53,54017.52630.428
Idaho69,92015.81422.63
Illinois453,26015.71334.142
Indiana273,38017.42325.913
Iowa111,52015.31033.239
Kansas130,21018.33032.134
Kentucky186,66018.43240.249
Louisiana255,64023.04828.021
Maine47,02018.53329.526
Maryland204,66015.2935.945
Massachusetts159,95011.7225.913
Michigan345,13015.91533.137
Minnesota163,31012.6424.99
Mississippi163,53022.94741.050
Missouri243,11017.52626.015
Montana36,91016.11727.618
Nebraska82,37017.42328.522
Nevada136,80020.03827.517
New Hampshire31,64012.3325.110
New Jersey260,34013.2534.944
New Mexico118,03024.15033.841
New York732,30017.62831.130
North Carolina461,63020.14030.428
North Dakota16,9009.8121.82
Ohio510,03019.63731.633
Oklahoma213,72022.24436.947
Oregon165,29018.93523.54
Pennsylvania437,34016.41829.024
Rhode Island35,76017.32131.431
South Carolina202,11018.33033.137
South Dakota34,97016.41824.06
Tennessee285,77018.93537.648
Texas1,658,68022.54631.532
Utah135,94014.7825.511
Vermont18,76015.91532.836
Virginia247,47013.2527.618
Washington284,76017.32124.68
West Virginia76,97020.64234.743
Wisconsin197,29015.41125.812
Wyoming23,96017.42329.125
United States12,540,00017.0%30.7%

a Food-insecure households are households with children that had difficulty meeting basic food needs for adults, children or both.

b States are ranked 1-50 with 1 meaning the lowest percent of children living in food-insecure households and 50 meaning the highest percent of children living in food-insecure households.

c Overweight is defined as BMI-for-age between the 85th and 95th percentile; obese is defined as BMI-for-age greater than or equal to the 95th percentile.

d States are ranked 1-50 with 1 meaning the lowest percent of children that are overweight or obese and 50 meaning the highest percent of children that are overweight or obese.

Sources: 2019. “Map the Meal Gap 2019: A Report on County and Congressional District Food Insecurity and County Food Cost in the United States in 2017.” Feeding America. https://www.feedingamerica.org/sites/default/files/2019-05/2017-map-the-meal-gap-full.pdf; 2017 National Survey of Children’s Health. 2018. “Indicator 1.4a: Weight Status (BMI) in 3 categories, Age 10-17 Years.” Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health. https://www.childhealthdata.org/browse/survey/allstates?q=6472.

Table 11: Average Monthly Number of Children Participating in SNAP and WIC

Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), FY2018Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), FY2019a
As a Percent of:Number of:
NumberAll ChildrenbAll SNAP ParticipantsAll ParticipantsInfantsChildren Under 5As a Percent of Children Under 5
Alabama347,00031.8%46.3%115,41031,41156,12719.1%
Alaska37,00020.141.015,9783,6318,64716.3
Arizona389,00023.747.3127,49833,27465,40915.0
Arkansas172,00024.547.267,23119,93330,04015.8
California1,901,00021.149.5929,173197,317527,80121.6
Colorado203,00016.045.781,73618,87343,59812.9
Connecticut136,00018.535.845,76712,18923,16612.6
Delaware59,00029.043.816,3584,5348,02014.6
District of Columbia37,00029.033.511,8443,5145,24411.5
Florida1,228,00029.040.4429,378107,952217,95819.1
Georgia721,00028.847.8202,91557,26793,62514.2
Hawaii62,00020.438.725,4156,20513,29515.2
Idaho74,00016.647.431,0007,39016,31514.0
Illinois775,00027.143.3182,34152,09586,50111.4
Indiana288,00018.447.5138,61135,44370,73816.9
Iowa144,00019.743.458,06413,95930,94315.6
Kansas95,00013.545.048,53612,00225,41013.4
Kentucky239,00023.739.994,29626,12246,10516.7
Louisiana401,00036.646.8103,17031,76444,34614.4
Maine55,00022.035.317,3554,1389,57814.9
Maryland252,00018.839.6122,56929,93463,44617.4
Massachusetts265,00019.434.9103,31522,80757,84616.1
Michigan470,00021.737.6205,36451,630109,19019.1
Minnesota186,00014.344.7100,12322,57855,58015.6
Mississippi244,00034.648.678,45722,87837,14720.0
Missouri319,00023.245.3106,73330,43049,03213.2
Montana44,00019.239.315,7543,8148,51213.6
Nebraska81,00017.048.933,5167,90918,07413.6
Nevada184,00026.742.557,51314,25129,97716.1
New Hampshire35,00013.641.112,1632,6397,01611.0
New Jersey331,00016.944.1134,93632,52570,30513.6
New Mexico190,00039.442.737,5389,38219,10315.4
New York1,006,00024.737.0378,85989,623201,16317.6
North Carolina441,00019.241.1206,78853,672102,38116.8
North Dakota22,00012.343.010,6622,4745,86510.7
Ohio579,00022.341.6192,57463,67982,89511.9
Oklahoma262,00027.446.466,62017,57132,86412.6
Oregon198,00022.732.481,22616,78346,57719.9
Pennsylvania629,00023.735.2202,16752,169105,33115.0
Rhode Island50,00024.432.817,9624,4319,71717.9
South Carolina302,00027.346.984,59626,07036,56512.5
South Dakota43,00019.849.114,8963,6868,06513.0
Tennessee414,00027.543.6112,15534,46347,98111.8
Texas2,035,00027.554.2681,555178,938315,82515.6
Utah95,00010.251.643,64610,42422,9469.1
Vermont23,00019.832.411,3212,1146,84823.1
Virginia323,00017.345.4109,46930,11352,65810.3
Washington296,00017.834.3135,29728,50376,95816.6
West Virginia112,00030.835.732,6748,88416,12316.9
Wisconsin260,00020.441.287,66621,19947,84514.3
Wyoming13,0009.646.17,6031,7794,02711.2
United States17,067,00023.3%43.6%6,227,7931,576,3633,170,72216.0%

a Average monthly participation data from October 2018 to June 2019 as of January 2020. All data are preliminary and subject to revision. Excludes participation from American Indian tribal organizations.

b Calculations made by the Children’s Defense Fund based on the annual estimates of the resident population on July 1, 2017.

c Calculations made by the Children’s Defense Fund based on the annual estimates of the resident population on July 1, 2018.

Sources: Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. 2019. “Characteristics of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Households: Fiscal Year 2018,” Table B.14. https://fns-prod.azureedge.net/sites/default/files/resource-files/Characteristics2018.pdf; U.S. Department of Agriculture. 2019. WIC Program Data. “Monthly Data-State Level Participation by Category and Program Costs – FY 2019 (Preliminary).” https://www.fns.usda.gov/pd/wic-program; U.S. Census Bureau. 2019. “Annual Estimates of the Resident Population by Sex, Age, Race, and Hispanic Origin for the United States and States: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018,” Table PEPASR6H. https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?src=bkmk.

Table 12: School and Summer Feeding Programs, 2017-2018 School Year and Summer 2018

Number of Children Participating in:Summer Food Service Particiation as a Percent of Free and Reduced-Price Lunch ParticipationState Rank Based on Summer Food Service Participation as a Percent of Free and Reduced-Price Lunch Participationa
Free and Reduced-Price LunchFree and Reduced-Price BreakfastSummer Food Service Programs
Alabama381,580227,74936,3519.5%35
Alaskab41,67222,9843,7198.937
Arizona488,816269,29356,97911.729
Arkansas240,289157,87724,24610.133
California2,582,7311,451,915413,45516.012
Colorado235,143142,03019,5888.339
Connecticutb178,53091,82933,97719.07
Delawareb66,83141,97910,41515.615
District of Columbiab47,70832,31715,27432.0
Floridab1,548,519792,185194,45812.628
Georgiab922,180553,981146,74615.913
Hawaiib65,86726,1705,3538.142
Idahob96,49054,95617,86918.58
Illinoisb825,852410,64387,41210.631
Indiana455,988233,60568,60915.019
Iowa184,16980,42618,62510.132
Kansas193,88896,86617,1548.838
Kentuckyb430,425283,97435,5288.340
Louisianab460,391279,73924,9185.449
Maine59,87436,80215,21425.42
Maryland315,147195,77565,42520.86
Massachusetts347,189186,74753,77215.517
Michiganb563,343331,97665,33811.630
Minnesota289,591158,57046,43716.011
Mississippi308,253185,26824,0347.844
Missouri371,665226,47429,3437.943
Montanab50,04129,4799,09118.29
Nebraska129,29857,0688,4706.648
Nevadab184,484114,69113,6887.446
New Hampshire35,38915,5134,82613.624
New Jersey453,791267,99895,51221.05
New Mexicob183,284128,55645,81625.04
New Yorkb1,384,373717,607348,38725.23
North Carolinab681,966397,03990,72413.326
North Dakotab34,23617,3512,8238.241
Ohiob658,813373,38061,9269.436
Oklahoma326,695188,87916,6125.150
Oregonb215,096118,37730,80814.322
Pennsylvania688,140352,45889,41613.027
Rhode Island52,70227,6729,23517.510
South Carolinab368,719231,51554,74914.820
South Dakota49,64923,0077,64015.418
Tennesseeb515,934333,41369,51613.525
Texas2,666,2611,670,472178,4306.747
Utahb166,26365,57225,88615.616
Vermontb27,22418,9227,82628.71
Virginiab457,822280,21064,29414.023
Washington354,622166,16234,8679.834
West Virginiab146,284122,37811,2287.745
Wisconsinb287,665150,86641,99614.621
Wyomingb25,54211,7734,01215.714
United States21,846,42212,452,4852,858,02213.1%

a States are ranked 1-50 with 1 meaning the highest percent of children who receive free or reduced-price lunch also participated in Summer Nutrition Programs and 50 meaning the lowest number of children who receive free or reduced-price lunch also participate in Summer Nutrition Programs.

b In these states, 50 percent or more of eligible school districts adopted the Community Eligibility Provision for the 2017-2018 school year. These high poverty school districts offered breakfast and lunch at no charge to all students without having to collect and process individual meal applications.

Note: Participation data are based on average daily meals served from September through May for the School Lunch and Breakfast Programs and in July for the Summer Food Service Program.

Sources: Girouard, Diane, Crystal FitzSimons, and Randy Rosso. 2019. “School Breakfast Scorecard: School Year 2017-2018.” Food Research and Action Center (FRAC). https://www.frac.org/wp-content/uploads/school-breakfast-scorecard-sy-2017-2018.pdf; Hayes, Clarissa, Randy Rosso, and Crystal FitzSimons. 2019. “Hunger Doesn’t Take a Vacation: Summer Nutrition Status Report.” FRAC. https://frac.org/wp-content/uploads/frac-summer-nutrition-report-2019.pdf; Mauric, Alison et al. 2019. “Community Eligibility: The Key to Hunger-Free Schools: School Year 2018-2019.” FRAC. https://www.frac.org/wp-content/uploads/community-eligibility-key-to-hunger-free-schools-sy-2018-2019.pdf.