Samuel DeWitt Proctor Institute for Child Advocacy Ministry

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Join us July 18-22 for the 2016 Proctor Institute "Praying with Our Feet: Pursuing Justice for Children from the Sanctuary to the Street."

Join clergy, seminarians, Christian educators, young adult leaders and other faith-based advocates for children for spiritual renewal, networking, movement-building workshops, and continuing education about the urgent needs of children at the intersection of race and poverty. Gain new inspiration, information, and ideas from preachers and noted plenary speakers who are making a difference to end child poverty and dismantle the Cradle to Prison PipelineTM. Come for an experience of Beloved Community and join in the intergenerational, interracial and multi-ethnic conversation with people who share your passion for justice for our nation’s children.

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Share the 2016 Proctor Institute for Child Advocacy Ministry with your faith-based community.

Please click here for an at-a-glance overview of the week's schedule.

For early risers, there’s Meditations for the Journey with Dr. Frederick J. Streets before breakfast, then witness powerful preaching by the Rev. Dr. Otis Moss, Jr. and the Rev. Dr. Otis Moss, III at Morning Devotions accompanied by the joyous, rousing music of the Resurrection Choir. The morning continues with a thought-provoking Bible/Theological Study led by Dr. Eileen W. Lindner and Dr. Walter J. Brueggemann, and Children's Concerns plenaries featuring Bishop Robert C. Wright and others. Choose from more than 20 interactive afternoon workshops to get equipped with new skills and strategies to build the movement for children. Each evening concludes with the Great Preacher Series featuring Rev. Courtney Clayton Jenkins, Dr. Michael Brandon McCormack, Dr. John W. Kinney and others. You won’t want to miss CDF president Marian Wright Edelman who will offer a welcoming Call at the begining of the Institute and the closing Charge. The week ends with a sermon by Civil Rights Leader, Rev. James Lawson, Jr. during a service of communion and commitment. 

About the 2016 Proctor Institute

Join 500 participants at the 2016 Proctor Institute for Child Advocacy Ministry to discover new insights, perspectives and crucial information that will equip you in your faithful work to end child poverty, dismantle the Cradle to Prison Pipeline™ and improve the lives of children.

Come for New Strategies, Skills, and Effective Models
Increase your advocacy and organizing skills, discover effective model programs that meet the needs of children, and deepen your understanding of how congregations may transform our communities to better nurture and protect all children in dynamic, interactive workshops. Participants may select three workshops (from more than 20 choices) to attend each day from 2-4 p.m. and then choose from a variety of late afternoon options. Participants will also take action to advocate for children each day in the Action Center with computers and staff there to help make an immediate difference on pending legislation and other urgent matters.

Come with Your Family!
A special Proctor CDF Freedom Schools® Program for children ages five to 15 meets each full day of Proctor to engage children in activities, reading enrichment, and fun while parents and other caregivers are in plenary sessions and workshops.

Come for Seminary Credit
A Monday pre-session (10 a.m. to 5 p.m.) and special sessions during the week are offered for seminarians of all ages, guided by the Proctor faculty in residence. Seminarian students who are interested in registering for the credit-bearing graduate course should sign up through their seminaries and register at the discounted price of $200. There is an opportunity for scholarships on a first come first served basis. For more information on scholarships and course credit please contact Janet Wolf at jwolf@childrensdefense.org.

Come for an Experience of Beloved Community
Join in an intergenerational, interracial and multi-ethnic ecumenical community of people who share a passion in working for justice for our nation’s children. Together we will sing and talk and share meals and exchange ideas and strengthen ourselves and each other to carry on in our work. Your heart and mind, body and soul will be renewed and recharged for action, all in the serene setting of CDF Haley Farm in Clinton, Tennessee, once home to Roots author Alex Haley and now the spiritual home of the children’s movement. You might be able to get a little of this at a typical conference, a little of that at church, a bit of this at a revival, and bit of that at a training. But the Samuel DeWitt Proctor Institute for Child Advocacy Ministry is the one place that has it all, a unique experience that will leave you informed, inspired, equipped, connected, and ready to put your faith even more effectively into action to seek justice for our nation’s children and to build the next generation of leaders for the children’s movement. We hope you join us in 2016.

2016 Great Preachers and Plenary Speakers

 
 
Dr. Walter J. Brueggemann
Bible Study Speaker
  Marian Wright Edelman
CDF President
  Rev. Courtney Clayton Jenkins
Great Preacher
         
 
 
Dr. John W. Kinney
Great Preacher
  Dr. Eileen W. Lindner
Bible Study Speaker
  Dr. Michael Brandon McCormack
Great Preacher
         
 
 
 
 
 
Dr. Otis Moss, III
Morning Devotions Preacher
  Dr. Otis Moss, Jr.
Morning Devotions Preacher
  Bishop Robert C. Wright
Children's Concerns
Plenary Speaker
         
Leadership: Proctor Institute

Rev. Shannon Daley-Harris

Proctor Institute Director

 

Rev. Janet Wolf

Director of CDF Haley Farm and
Nonviolent Direct Action Organizing

     
 

Dr. Otis Moss, III.

Proctor Co-Pastor-in-Residence

 

Dr. Otis Moss, Jr.

Proctor Co-Pastor-in-Residence

     

Dr. Eli Wilson

Proctor Institute Director of Music

 

Mr. Don Lewis

Proctor Institute Organist

Rev. Will Gipson

Proctor Co-Chaplain-in-Residence

 

Dr. Frederick J. Streets

Proctor Co-Chaplain-in-Residence

 

Dr. Eileen W. Lindner

Proctor Theologian-in-Residence

         

Eric Brown

CDF Nonviolent Direct Action Organizing Team

 

Damien Durr

CDF Nonviolent Direct Action Organizing Team

 

Ndume Olatushani

CDF Nonviolent Direct Action Organizing Team

2016 Schedule at a Glance
     Monday    Tuesday    Wednesday    Thursday    Friday
                     
Meditations for the Journey
7:00-8:00 a.m.
      Dr. Frederick J. Streets   Dr. Frederick J. Streets    Dr. Frederick J. Streets     
                     
Breakfast
7:30-8:30 a.m.
                   
                     
Devotions
8:45-9:45 a.m.
      Dr. Otis Moss, III    Dr. Otis Moss, Jr. and
Dr. Otis Moss, III
  Dr. Otis Moss, Jr.   Charge
Marian Wright Edelman
                     
Bible/Theological Study
10:15-11:00 a.m.
  Seminarian Pre-Session 
10:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 
  Dr. Eileen W. Lindner   Dr. Walter J. Brueggemann   Dr. Walter J. Brueggemann   Communion
Rev. James A. Lawson, Jr.,
Preaching
                     
Reflect & Respond
11:00-11:30 a.m.
                   
                     
Children's Concerns
11:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m.
      Learning from Our Past
Bishop Robert C. Wright and Younger Voices
  Looking at Our Present
TBA
  Re-Writing the Future
TBA
  Post Sessions
11:30 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
                     
Action
12:15-12:30 p.m.
      Advocacy Action   Advocacy Action   Freedom Schools Scholars    
                     
Lunch
12:30-2:00 p.m.
                   
                     
Workshops/Organizing Training
2:00-4:00 p.m.
  First-Timers Orientation   Click to View   Click to View    Click to View     
                     
Late Afternoon Options
4:15-6:00 p.m.
  Tour, Screening   Click to View   Click to View   Click to View    
                     
Dinner
6:00-7:30 p.m.
                   
                     
Great Preachers
7:30-8:30 p.m.
  Welcome
Marian Wright Edelman
and Rev. Courtney Clayton Jenkins
  Dr. Michael Brandon McCormack   TBA   Dr. John W. Kinney    
2016 Workshop Descriptions

Workshops are held from 2:00-4:00 p.m. on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. You may choose to take all three workshops offered within one "track" or you may select workshops from two or three different tracks. However, if a workshop is described as "Part 1 and Part 2" you are encouraged to register for both. This year, workshop selection is included in the initial on-line registration process so you may make your choices now.

Afternoon Workshop Descriptions

Faith-Rooted Organizing Track

TUESDAY: Faith-Rooted Organizing Part 1 - Drawing from the Deep Wells to Change Systems

People of faith have unique gifts to bring to the broader movement for justice for children. How do we inspire and equip faith leaders and congregations to bring all of our gifts to the table? Faith-rooted organizing takes seriously the active agency of God’s Spirit and our role in partnering with God to go beyond direct service to community development and community organizing using approaches that are “wise as serpents and innocent as doves.” Session #1 will focus on faith foundations and orientation as well as key faith-rooted tools for social transformation. Session #2 will focus on recruitment, leadership development, mobilizing churches and sustaining the movement.

Rev. Alexia Salvatierra is an ordained Lutheran Pastor with 35 years of experience in community ministry, including community development and community organizing. She is the co-author of “Faith-Rooted Organizing” and currently serves as adjunct faculty for seven seminaries, in the U.S. and in Latin America. She also trains, coaches and consults with a wide variety of national and international ministries, including World Vision, the Christian Community Development Association and Intervarsity Christian Fellowship. For over 20 years, she has been a national leader in the area of immigrant rights and the struggle for immigration reform. For over a decade, she was the Executive Director of Clergy and Laity United for Economic Justice of California, focused primarily on issues of working poverty. She is the proud mother of a 22-year-old activist.

WEDNESDAY: Preaching Social Justice

When Jesus told the disciples to go and make disciples of all nations, what did he really mean? This workshop will give you the courage to preach, teach and lead with a commitment to nonviolence and social transformation.

Dr. Otis Moss, Jr., is the Pastor Emeritus of Olivet Institutional Baptist Church in Cleveland, Ohio. Prior to his post at Olivet, he served as co-pastor with Dr. Martin Luther King, Sr., at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta. He received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Morehouse College, his Master of Divinity from Morehouse School of Religion/ITC, and his Doctor of Ministry from the United Theological Seminary. For more than 30 years, Dr. Moss has been directly involved in the civil rights movement as a religious leader and community activist and espouses the nonviolent approach for affecting social and political change. He has a strong philosophical bond to Mahatma Gandhi, Howard Thurman, and Martin Luther King, Jr. Dr. Moss is the recipient of many honors, including four honorary doctorates and a citation in 2000 from the Howard University College of Medicine. He has long served in leadership capacities including chairman of the Board of Trustees of Morehouse College. He is a life member of the NAACP and served as a consultant to former President Jimmy Carter. He was the Lyman Beecher Lecturer for Yale University Divinity School in 2004. Dr. Moss has been selected twice by Ebony magazine as one of "America's 15 Greatest Black Preachers" and listed as one of 30 people who have defined Cleveland in the last 30 years.

THURSDAY: Faith-Rooted Organizing Part 2 - Getting People Off the Couch and Away from the Screen to Change Systems

People of faith have unique gifts to bring to the broader movement for justice for children. How do we inspire and equip faith leaders and congregations to bring all of our gifts to the table? Faith-rooted organizing takes seriously the active agency of God’s Spirit and our role in partnering with God to go beyond direct service to community development and community organizing using approaches that are “wise as serpents and innocent as doves.” Session #2 teaches the skills of engaging individuals and congregations in this work and sustaining their participation for the long haul.

Rev. Alexia Salvatierra is an ordained Lutheran Pastor with 35 years of experience in community ministry, including community development and community organizing. She is the co-author of “Faith-Rooted Organizing” and currently serves as adjunct faculty for seven seminaries, in the U.S. and in Latin America. She also trains, coaches and consults with a wide variety of national and international ministries, including World Vision, the Christian Community Development Association and Intervarsity Christian Fellowship. For over 20 years, she has been a national leader in the area of immigrant rights and the struggle for immigration reform. For over a decade, she was the Executive Director of Clergy and Laity United for Economic Justice of California, focused primarily on issues of working poverty. She is the proud mother of a 22-year-old activist.


Nonviolent Direct Action Organizing Track

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY: Becoming Beloved Community: Nonviolent Direct Action Organizing, Part 1 & 2

This two-part workshop will focus on nonviolent direct action organizing, including the importance of relationship and community building as central to movement building. We are faced with extreme abuse of police power, growing income inequality, declining quality of public education of wealth and political power. These workshops will explore nonviolent direct action organizing work that affirms the dignity, worth and enormous unrealized potential of all, with an emphasis on those who are impoverished and most marginalized. These interactive sessions will draw on the experience of 50 years of movement building that involves neighborhoods, organized labor, churches and other faith-based institutions, truth and reconciliation initiatives and work with gang members.

The Rev. Nelson N. Johnson, Executive Director of the Beloved Community Center of Greensboro, has been active in the movement for social and economic justice since high school. He served as president of the National Student Organization for Black Unity in the 70’s. As a student leader, he worked closely with the NAACP on voter registration, redevelopment, housing, education, open public accommodations and worker justice. He served as Chairperson of the Chicago-based Interfaith Worker Justice and Chairperson of the Gulf Coast Commission on Reconstruction Equity, established in response to the devastation from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. He continues to work for social and economic justice in Greensboro as Pastor of Faith Community Church and Co-Director of the Beloved Community Center of Greensboro. The Rev. Johnson was among the first 17 people arrested in the NC Moral Monday Movement in 2013. Guided by his multiple emphases of faith, diversity, justice and democracy, he is actively providing leadership among faith groups, organized labor and community organizations in Greensboro and the south.

Joyce Hobson Johnson, Director of the Jubilee Institute of the Beloved Community Center of Greensboro, has been an activist since high school in Richmond, VA during the 1960s struggle for civil rights and open accommodations. She deepened her involvement in college while supporting campus non-academic employees and the movement for relevant education. A former university business professor and transportation research director, Johnson and others established the pace-setting Greensboro Truth and Community Reconciliation Project in 2001. This initiative was designed to encourage truth, understanding, and healing related to the tragic murder of five labor and racial justice organizers by Ku Klux Klan and American Nazi Party members on November 3, 1979. In addition, Johnson is a member of the Executive Committee of the NC NAACP, the lead entity of the Moral Monday Movement and a co-chair of the National Council of Elders.

The Rev. James Lawson, Jr. was a leading theoretician and tactician of nonviolence and key adviser to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on nonviolent direct action strategies in the Civil Rights Movement. He continues to train activists in nonviolence. In 1951, Rev. Lawson was sentenced to three years in prison for refusing the Korean War draft. Drawing on the example of Christ’s suffering, he taught growing numbers of Black and White students how to organize sit-ins and any other form of action that would force America to confront the immorality of segregation. Rev. Lawson helped coordinate the Freedom Rides in 1961 and the Meredith March in 1966, and while working as a pastor at the Centenary Methodist Church in Memphis, he played a major role in the sanitation workers strike of 1968. On the eve of his assassination, Martin Luther King, Jr. called Lawson “the leading theorist and strategist of nonviolence in the world.” Rev. Lawson graduated from Baldwin-Wallace College and received a Master in Theology from Boston University.

THURSDAY: Praying With Our Feet: Responding to Racial Profiling and Police Misconduct

Description Coming Soon!

Rev. Traci Blackmon  is the Acting Executive Minister of Justice & Witness Ministries for The United Church of Christ and Pastor of Christ The King United Church of Christ in Florissant, MO—the first woman pastor in its 159-year history. Initially ordained in the African Methodist Episcopal Church, Rev. Blackmon served in various ministry capacities for nine years prior to this call. Rev. Blackmon was appointed to the Ferguson Commission by Missouri Governor Jay Nixon and co-chaired the Municipal Governance and Court Reform workgroup. Rev. Blackmon’s early and consistent response to racial tensions exposed after the killing of Michael Brown, Jr. in Ferguson, MO, earned her awards including the White House President’s Volunteer Service Award; the St. Louis American Stellar Award; 2015 Ebony Magazine Power 100; St. Louis University - Community Leader of the Year; the NAACP - Rosa Parks Award; and others. She holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing from Birmingham - Southern College, and a Master of Divinity degree and an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree from Eden Theological Seminary.


Sharing Our Stories and Speaking Our Truth Track

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY: Fearless Dialogues, Part 1 & 2

Fearless Dialogues is a grassroots initiative committed to creating spaces for unlikely partners to engage in hard, heartfelt conversations that see gifts in others, hear value in stories and work for change and positive transformation in self and other. The Fearless Dialogues team creates spaces for transformation like none other in which radical hospitality lessens anxiety, reduces power differences and levels the playing field for hard conversations to occur. Artistic mediums, like visual art, spoken word poetry and live music, reframe sterile and hostile environments into spaces for lively and engaging interaction with exercises that heighten sensitivity to stereotypes and power differentials, facilitate authentic and vulnerable truth-sharing, and foster connections that inspire prophetic service.

The Rev. Dr. Gregory C. Ellison, II, is the Associate Professor of Pastoral Care and Counseling at Candler School of Theology at Emory University. Dr. Ellison has written several articles and speaks extensively on issues related to adolescence, hope, marginalization, and muteness and invisibility in African American young men. Ellison is the author of Cut Dead But Still Alive: Caring for African American Young Men and the co-founder of Fearless Dialogues, a grassroots community empowerment initiative to improve the lives of African American young men. He is an ordained Baptist minister who has served in Methodist and Presbyterian churches.

THURSDAY: Storytelling and Art

We will explore powerful stories from young people who have used their hands and hearts to tell and create a pathway towards a brighter tomorrow.

Eric Brown, CDF Nashville Organizing Team

Damien Durr, CDF Nashville Organizing Team

Ndume Olatushani, CDF Nashville Organizing Team


From the Sanctuary into the Streets: Learning From and Standing with Children, Youths and Families Track

TUESDAY: Changing the Narrative and the Policies - Poets, Pastors, Preachers and Prophets

"We the People of Detroit" organizers and others will explore the impact of austerity policies on children and the poor and how we can work for effective systemic change through grassroots organizing with those hardest hit. "We the People of Detroit" promotes community coalition-building and provides mechanisms and vehicles intended to inform, train and mobilize the residents of Detroit to improve their quality of life.

WEDNESDAY: Ministry with Children of Incarcerated Parents - Principles and Practice

This workshop will cover some foundational principles for consideration while developing and implementing trauma informed ministry with children in our communities and congregations who have parents who are, or have been, incarcerated. Participants will be able to identify systemic sources of trauma, ACE’s (adverse childhood experiences), and ways trauma informed ministry can combat these. The workshop will present ministry models that use these principles as they work with children of incarcerated parents and encourage participants to imagine what ministry with children might look like when they adopt these principles in their own context.

Cheryl Faries, MA, is currently Director of Program Development and Research for the Tampa Bay Center for Community Transformation. Formerly Vice Chair of the Waterloo Commission on Human Rights, and Co-Chair of Cedar Valley Citizens for Undoing Racism. Cheryl’s passion is for Women’s empowerment and family development.

Doug Walker, M.Div is currently Director of Strategic Partnerships and Training for the Tampa Bay Center for Community Transformation, and is a criminal justice consultant for the General Board of Church and Society of the United Methodist Church. He is a sought after speaker, panelist, trainer, workshop presenter and facilitator. Doug is currently pursuing his Ph.D. in Public Policy and Social Change at Union Institute & University where his area of interest is social and policy change through bringing Martin Luther King’s concept of the beloved community to bear on public safety.

THURSDAY: Vote Local - Working with Young Folks Targeted by the Cradle to Prison Pipeline™

This session will engage participants who want to work with young people targeted by the Cradle to Prison Pipeline to explore race, politics and what justice might look like through the narratives of young folks and in their context.

Eric Brown, CDF Nashville Organizing Team

Damien Durr, CDF Nashville Organizing Team

Ndume Olatushani, CDF Nashville Organizing Team

The Rev. Dr. Janet Wolf, Director of CDF Haley Farm and Nonviolent Organizing


Self-Care for Activists Track

TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY: Loving at the Margins - Getting Radical About Self-Care

"Caring for myself is not self-indulgence. It is self-preservation and that is an act of political warfare." - Audre Lorde

There is a lot of talk these days about the importance of self-care. The injunction to get enough rest; to lead more “balanced” lives and to “save some for ourselves” in the midst of competing and overwhelming demands is everywhere, and that’s not a bad thing. But, in the face of persistent assaults against the bodies, minds and spirits of people of color, the poor, women and countless other marginalized people and communities, is the injunction to “take better care,” enough?  What are the arms we need to muster in our spiritual arsenal in order to translate that charge into a deeply rooted and enlivening life practice? What does it mean for marginalized people to understand self-care as a radical, as a prophetic act?  What is the connection between our call to activism and advocacy for others and the right regard we attach to our own bodies, minds and spirits in the world? In this participatory workshop we will explore what it means to get radical about self-care through a combination of ritual, storytelling and radical self-care agenda creation.

Lisa Anderson is Vice President of Intersectional Engagement and Strategic Convening at Auburn Theological Seminary in NYC. In her capacity at Auburn Ms. Anderson works with Auburn’s senior education team on issues of intersectional organizing, bridging the divide between theology and activism, and on deepening the spiritually grounding of leaders in a multifaith movement for justice. Ms. Anderson is also the founding director of Auburn’s Sojourner Truth Leadership Circle (STLC). Launched in 2013 the Sojourner Truth Leadership Circle is a fellowship program whose specific mission is to make the ordinary care of the bodies, minds and spirits of Black women a priority in their own lives and within the social justice spaces where black women leaders disproportionately serve. The STLC equips Black women leaders, seeking to advance movements for justice within Black and Brown communities, through a methodology that incorporates a vigorous and spiritually grounded practice of self-care as a part of a leader’s public witness. A trained theologian, Ms. Anderson holds a Master of Divinity and Master of Philosophy degree from Union Theological Seminary.


Stronger Together: Intersecting Justice Movements Track

TUESDAY: Climate Catastrophe and Black Lives Matter: What Are the Connections?

Several analysts have asserted that the economic and technological systems that have brought us to climate crisis represent the ultimate historical expression of white supremacy. This workshop will explore how communities of color and poor countries around the world are experiencing the "first and worst" effects of our interlocking ecological crises, and outline the tradition of "environmental racism" as a critique and movement. Then we’ll look at how marginalized communities are organizing for survival, resiliency and ecojustice, both abroad and at home. We’ll focus on the exemplary work of "Faith in Place" and Trinity UCC in Chicago, and the Western Atlanta Watershed Alliance in Georgia. We will explore how churches and community groups can integrate into their local and regional work two disciplines: reconnection to the land upon which they live; and interconnecting ecojustice, social justice and the gospel.

Dr. Elaine Enns has been working in the field of restorative justice and conflict transformation since 1989 as victim-offender dialogue facilitator, consultant, educator and trainer. A Canadian, she holds an M.A. in Theology and Peacemaking from the Mennonite Brethren Biblical Seminary and a Doctor of Ministry from Saskatoon Theological Union. She provides mediation and consultation services for individuals, churches, schools and community organizations throughout North America, and has taught at Fresno Pacific University, Canadian Mennonite University and Menno Simons College at the University of Winnipeg, Manitoba. Ched and Elaine Enns co-direct Bartimaeus Cooperative Ministries in southern California, and are co-authors of Ambassadors of Reconciliation: A New Testament Theology and Diverse Christian Practices of Restorative Justice and Peacemaking.

Rev. Aaron McLeod is the Executive Director of Special Projects in the Office of the Senior Pastor at Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago, IL. In this role, he works with the Senior Pastor on all his initiatives and supports the activities of his senior administrative team. Rev. McLeod is ordained clergy and has standing in the United Church of Christ. Recently, he has gained pastoral experience by serving as the Interim Pastor of Bethany Evangelical Lutheran Church in Chicago, IL. He is a graduate of University of Iowa College of Law, Harvard University School of Divinity, and Morehouse College and has completed a leadership fellowship at University of Illinois School of Public Health, a Certificate in Mediation from Northwestern University, and he has studied in the School of Management at Lancaster University in Lancaster, England.

Ched Myers is an activist theologian who has worked in social change movements for 40 years. With a degree in New Testament Studies, he is a popular educator who animates scripture and issues of faith-based peace and justice, and has taught around the world. Author of over 100 articles and a half-dozen books, including Binding the Strong Man: A Political  Reading of Mark’s Story of Jesus (Orbis, 1988/2008) and most recently, Our God is Undocumented: Biblical Faith and Immigrant Justice (with Matthew Colwell, Orbis, 2012), his publications can be found at www.ChedMyers.org. Ched has co-founded several collaborative projects: the Word and World School; the Sabbath Economics Collaborative; the Center and Library for the Bible and Social Justice; and the Watershed Discipleship Alliance.

WEDNESDAY: God is Undocumented: Gospel Hospitality and Immigrant Rights

Economic forces of globalization and displacement political forces of war and discrimination move vulnerable people around the landscape like great tides. Though undocumented immigrants and refugees are among the most marginalized among us, they are often victims of "nativist" and racist backlash. Yet biblical faith enjoins radical hospitality for the "sojourner," and Jesus himself began his life as a homeless refugee. This workshop will offer a few theological reflections concerning God’s special concern for displaced people, and practical suggestions for how churches can embrace solidarity with the immigrant "least among us." We will suggest how the realities facing immigrants can impact our preaching and worship, our local ministry and our social witness, and explore several practical responses that integrate immigrant rights with human rights and social justice.

Ched Myers is an activist theologian who has worked in social change movements for 40 years. With a degree in New Testament Studies, he is a popular educator who animates scripture and issues of faith-based peace and justice, and has taught around the world. Author of over 100 articles and a half-dozen books, including Binding the Strong Man: A Political  Reading of Mark’s Story of Jesus (Orbis, 1988/2008) and most recently, Our God is Undocumented: Biblical Faith and Immigrant Justice (with Matthew Colwell, Orbis, 2012), his publications can be found at www.ChedMyers.org. Ched has co-founded several collaborative projects: the Word and World School; the Sabbath Economics Collaborative; the Center and Library for the Bible and Social Justice; and the Watershed Discipleship Alliance.

Rev. Alexia Salvatierra is an ordained Lutheran Pastor with 35 years of experience in community ministry, including community development and community organizing. She is the co-author of “Faith-Rooted Organizing” and currently serves as adjunct faculty for seven seminaries, in the U.S. and in Latin America. She also trains, coaches and consults with a wide variety of national and international ministries, including World Vision, the Christian Community Development Association and Intervarsity Christian Fellowship. For over 20 years, she has been a national leader in the area of immigrant rights and the struggle for immigration reform. For over a decade, she was the Executive Director of Clergy and Laity United for Economic Justice of California, focused primarily on issues of working poverty. She is the proud mother of a 22-year-old activist.

THURSDAY: Black LGBTQ Youth Lives Matter

Across the country LGBTQ Youth are experiencing high rates of homelessness, suicide, harassment and violence. Many LGBTQ youth have grown up in a world in which parents, teachers, churches and ministers have been hostile to their God given identity. Our ministries must do better. Black LGBTQ Youth Lives Matter. In this session, we will make a theological case that God is on the side of marginalized people and that God comes out as love for LGBTQ youth. Participants will examine biblical text, hear personal stories and engage in dynamic conversations that will inspire concrete action to shift and transform ministries in order to end the violence and harm done to LGBTQ youth. Finally, this session will explore practical tools to create ministries that are open and affirming to LGBTQ youth.

Rev. Rodney McKenzie, Jr. is the Director of the Academy for Leadership and Action at the National LGBTQ Task Force, is an out person of faith, community organizer and a reverend. Over the last thirteen years, he’s worked for organizations fighting for grassroots political power in marginalized communities. From being a Field Organizer at the Task Force in 2002 to recently being the Spiritual Director and Co-Creator of Expansion Church, his work focuses on the intersection of community organizing and radical spirituality in the public square. Rev. McKenzie is currently a Master of Divinity candidate at Union Theological Seminary. By putting James Baldwin, Audre Lorde, Essex Hemphill and the Apostle Paul in conversation, he’s constructing a liberation theology that challenges how theology and LGBTQI politics approach the intersection of race, class and sexuality. Originally from Dallas, Texas, Rev. McKenzie currently resides in New York City, New York.


Becoming Child Advocacy Champions with Congress and in Our Communities Track

TUESDAY: Closing the Opportunity Gap

This session will share information, strategies, tools and motivation to help participants end child poverty and close the opportunity gap in their communities, their states and nationally. Drawing on CDF's research, reports, and campaigns, this first session will offer a discussion of how poverty hurts children and how the opportunity gap affects us all. We will discuss specific policy and program investments that can be made right now and how we can build public will to enact them. Additional emerging legislative opportunities and concerns may be addressed.

MaryLee Allen is the CDF Policy Director and Director of Child Welfare and Mental Health for the Children’s Defense Fund and was a collaborator on CDF’s Ending Child Poverty Now report.

WEDNESDAY: Beyond Schoolhouse Rock - Understanding the Legislative Process and Building Relationships with Legislators

This session will help you prepare to raise your voice in your State Legislature and in Congress on behalf of our nation's children. It will focus on the nuts and bolts of legislative advocacy: how does a bill become a law? How can you effectively connect with your legislators? How do you engage others? What are important lessons to remember? No question is too basic for this session.

MaryLee Allen is the CDF Policy Director and Director of Child Welfare and Mental Health for the Children’s Defense Fund and was a collaborator on CDF’s Ending Child Poverty Now report.

THURSDAY: Taking Proctor Home - Building Action Plans

Participants in this workshop will focus on ways they can take the skills, information and strategies they gained at Proctor to engage their own faith community back home in action. Participants will draft outlines of action plans and discuss strategies, approaches, and models that will be most effective in creating positive change for children in their communities and beyond by tapping resources and building power to meet needs and transform priorities.

MaryLee Allen is the CDF Policy Director and Director of Child Welfare and Mental Health for the Children’s Defense Fund and was a collaborator on CDF’s Ending Child Poverty Now report.


Pipeline to Promise: Building Communities, Schools, and Systems that Support and Protect Children Track

TUESDAY: Ending Zero Tolerance Discipline Policies

Discipline policies and practices in public schools across the nation are excessively punitive and racially biased, criminalizing young people from impoverished communities, especially black and brown youth, for offenses such as truancy.This participatory workshop will focus on listening to and working in partnership with young people in impoverished communities of color to challenge and change zero tolerance discipline policies and practices.

Eric Brown, CDF Nashville Organizing Team

Damien Durr, CDF Nashville Organizing Team

Bey Jones, CDF Nashville Organizing Team

Ndume Olatushani, CDF Nashville Organizing Team

Abdullah Rahim, CDF Nashville Organizing Team

Micky Scott, CDF Nashville Organizing Team

WEDNESDAY: Community Justice Circles

The contemporary Restorative Justice movement seeks alternatives to the retribution and punishment of the Criminal Justice System. Adopting and adapting models of traditional Indigenous relational justice, RJ practitioners have been experimenting with circles of facilitated conversation between victims, offenders and their communities. These dialogues seek to provide grassroots opportunities for truth-telling, support and accountability, reparations, healing from trauma and sometimes even forgiveness. This workshop will explore how these transformative practices can be used in prisons, schools, community groups and churches. We will also examine issues of race, class and gender power disparity in these settings. This introduction to restorative circles will enable participants to imagine how these practices could be adapted for their context, and encourage them to seek further training to implement these models.

Dr. Elaine Enns has been working in the field of restorative justice and conflict transformation since 1989 as victim-offender dialogue facilitator, consultant, educator and trainer. A Canadian, she holds an M.A. in Theology and Peacemaking from the Mennonite Brethren Biblical Seminary and a Doctor of Ministry from Saskatoon Theological Union. She provides mediation and consultation services for individuals, churches, schools and community organizations throughout North America, and has taught at Fresno Pacific University, Canadian Mennonite University and Menno Simons College at the University of Winnipeg, Manitoba. Ched and Elaine Enns co-direct Bartimaeus Cooperative Ministries in southern California, and are co-authors of Ambassadors of Reconciliation: A New Testament Theology and Diverse Christian Practices of Restorative Justice and Peacemaking.

Damien Durr, CDF Nashville Organizing Team

THURSDAY: Freedom Schools

Come discover how you can host or involve your congregation or community in the CDF Freedom Schools movement. Participants will gain an overview of the concept and vision behind this successful summer and after-school enrichment program for children ages five to 18. The CDF Freedom Schools program integrates reading, conflict resolution and social action in an activity-based curriculum that promotes social, cultural and historical awareness.

CDF Freedom Schools® Staff

Ella Baker Trainers are important members of the national CDF Freedom Schools family. Their commitment and passion for children and youth, and expertise in the CDF Freedom Schools program, add tremendous value to the CDF Freedom Schools program nationwide.


Late Afternoon Options 

Children’s Defense Fund Programs and Priorities

TUESDAY: Freedom Schools

Come discover how you can host or involve your congregation or community in the CDF Freedom Schools movement. Participants will gain an overview of the concept and vision behind this successful summer and after-school enrichment program for children ages five to 18. The CDF Freedom Schools program integrates reading, conflict resolution and social action in an activity-based curriculum that promotes social, cultural and historical awareness.

Shaquite Pegues and Robin Sally, CDF Freedom Schools® Program

WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY: Children’s Sabbath

Learn how you can engage your congregation in the National Observance of Children’s Sabbaths® celebration, a national multifaith program of the Children’s Defense Fund, to renew and increase witness and work for justice for all children. This will be an interactive workshop generating practical planning strategies and creative ideas for worship, education, outreach and advocacy that you can take back to your congregation and community to engage them in the 2016 Children’s Sabbath.

The Rev. Shannon Daley-Harris, CDF Religious Affairs Advisor and Director of the Proctor Institute


Resurrection Choir (5:15-6:00 p.m.)

All are welcome to participate in the Resurrection Choir under the direction of Dr. Eli Wilson, Proctor’s Minister of Music, with Don Lewis, Proctor’s organist. Rehearsals are held in the Lodge each evening. The choir sings at the evening Great Preacher Series worship and Morning Devotions. It is never too late to join in, so if you are inspired by the choir on the first night, join for the next!


Rest and Relaxation

A shuttle bus will leave from the area in front of the Registration Tables for hotels at 4:15 p.m. for those who wish to rest in their hotels. Shuttles will depart hotels to return participants to CDF Haley Farm in time for dinner followed by worship. Please refer to the Shuttle Bus Schedule for specific pick-up times from the hotels.


Intergenerational Dialogue

Informal self-facillitated conversations for intergenerational listening and learning.


Seminarian Sessions

Those who are attending Proctor for credit as part of the Proctor Seminary Course will attend the Seminarian Sessions. (All seminarians are also welcome to participate.)


Denominational Gatherings

TUESDAY: Pan-Methodist (AME, AMEZion, CME, UMC)

WEDNESDAY: Presbyterian and Baptist

THURSDAY: Episcopalian and UCC




Special Opportunities for Seminarian Students

The Proctor Institute has special opportunities for students at seminaries and divinity schools. A Seminarian Pre-Session will be held on Monday, July 18th from 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. and is open to all seminarians who attend the Proctor Institute in any capacity. The Seminarian track registration is $200.00 and students should register here. Seminarians who are interested in registering for the credit-bearing graduate course should sign up through their seminaries. 

Seminarian students who participate in the Proctor Institute for course credit will then meet with our faculty, Proctor 2016 Professors-in-Residence, each afternoon for two hours to discuss and reflect on the day’s sessions and for further engagement with some of the 2016 Proctor leaders. There is an opportunity for scholarships on a first come first serve basis. For more information on scholarships and course credit please contact Janet Wolf at jwolf@childrensdefense.org

Sign up and register for the 22nd Annual Samuel DeWitt Proctor Institute and Child Advocacy Ministry.

Teaching Faculty

Dr. Gregory Ellison

Candler School of Theology,
Professor and author, Cut Dead but Still Alive: Caring for African American Youth

 

Dr. Derek Hicks

Wake Forest University School of Divinity
Professor and author, Reclaiming Spirit in the Black Faith Tradition

     

Dr. Christophe Ringer

Chicago Theological Seminary
Professor and former pastor - "Necropolitics: The Religious Situation of U.S. Mass Incarceration"

 

Dr. Charlene Sinclair

Union Theological Seminary
Founding Director of Center for Race, Religion and Economic Democracy

     

Rev. Dr. Janet Wolf

Children's Defense Fund

   

Faculty Co-Facilitators

Ched Myers

Activist Theologian, Popular Educator, Author and Partner in Bartimaeus Cooperative Ministries

 

Rodney Sadler

Associate Professor of Bible, Union Presbyterian Seminary at Charlotte
Associate Pastor, Mount Carmel Baptist Church

Special Opportunities for Children

About the Proctor Institute CDF Freedom Schools® Program

Children ages five through 15 who have pre-registered will participate in the abbreviated CDF Freedom Schools program during the three full days of the 22nd Samuel DeWitt Proctor Institute for Child Advocacy Ministry. Please contact JWilliams@childrensdefense.org if you need to register your child/children.

Pre-Registration

Children must have pre-registered by July 1st to participate in the Proctor Institute CDF Freedom School. The is no on-site registration for children who participate in the Freedom Schools program, staff numbers are determined based on pre-registration and we will not have the capacity to serve additional children safely. Please contact JWilliams@childrensdefense.org if you need to register your child/children.

Days and Hours

The Proctor CDF Freedom School program is held on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, and begins at 8:45am and concludes at 4:00pm (this schedule is designed to enable parents or other caregivers to participate fully in the morning plenaries and in the afternoon workshops). Children are invited and encouraged to accompany their parents or caregivers to evening worship and to the closing worship service Friday morning.

Pick-up and Drop-off

Parents or other caregivers should pick-up and drop-off their children at the small white tent behind the White House. Please use the sign-in and sing-out sheet each time to help leaders track arrivals and departures.

Staying Cool

The CDF Freedom Schools program will include outdoor activities and play. As needed, the children and leaders may hold sessions in the common rooms of the White House to cool off in the air conditioning. Water will be available to the children throughout the day so they can stay hydrated. Please be sure your child has the proper sunscreen, hat and clothing for the weather. The children may have the opportunity to play in the sprinkler or enjoy other water fun, so please send them with a bathing suit and towel or an extra set of clothes each day.

Leadership

The Proctor Institute CDF Freedom School site is led by Servant Leaders who are Ella Baker Trainers (EBTs). EBTs are an extension to the national staff and aid in the successful implementation of the CDF Freedom Schools program. EBTs help to facilitate training, especially on the Integrated Reading Curriculum, to Executive and Project Directors, Site Coordinators, and college-aged Servant Leader Interns. Your children will be in caring and capable hands for these rich and fun-filled days.

Logistics: Proctor Insititute for Child Advocacy

Arrivals 

The Proctor Institute begins on Monday, July 18, with a pre-session for seminarians from 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Registration opens at noon and lunch will be available for early arrivals. Orientation for first-time participants begins at 2 p.m., a guided walking tour of CDF Haley Farm is offered at 4 p.m., choir rehearsal for any interested singers begins at 5:15 p.m., and dinner is at 6 p.m. The formal start of the Proctor Institute is at 7 p.m. with a welcoming address by CDF President Marian Wright Edelman followed by the opening of the Great Preachers Series.

Departures

The Proctor Institute will conclude on Friday, July 22, with an 8 a.m. breakfast followed by a 9 a.m. Charge and Call to Action and a Communion Service from 10:00 – 11:00 a.m. Allow at least two hours from your CDF Haley Farm departure until your flight’s departure time (this includes shuttle schedule and the recommended hour for check-in). We encourage you to schedule a flight that will allow you to remain for the closing communion service. You won’t want to miss this special culmination of the week. Please contact Ken Libby at KLibby@childrensdefense.org to provide your travel information when your plans are finalized.

Transportation 

If you will be flying, you should book your flight to McGhee Tyson Airport in Knoxville, Tennessee. CDF provides round-trip airport shuttle service from McGhee Tyson Airport to CDF Haley Farm for a fee of $60. If you will be driving to the Proctor Institute, you can find driving directions at www.haleyfarm.org. There is ample free parking at CDF Haley Farm.

Housing

You will need to make your own arrangements for lodging during the week. 
The recommended hotels in Clinton, Tenn. are listed below. Please call the hotel directly and indicate that you are a Proctor Institute participant. Special rates are available for reservations confirmed by July 1, 2016. A free CDF shuttle will transport participants between these hotels and CDF Haley Farm. Some participants enjoy the short walk between these hotels and Haley Farm.

  • Country Inn & Suites (865) 457-4311
  • Comfort Inn (865) 457-2255
  • Hampton Inn (865) 691-8070
  • Holiday Inn Express (865) 691-8070
  • Super 8 (865) 457-2311

CDF Freedom Schools Pre-Registration

Children must have pre-registered by July 1st to participate in the Proctor Institute CDF Freedom School. There is no on-site registration for children who participate in the Freedom Schools program, staff numbers are determined based on pre-registration and we will not have the capacity to serve additional children safely. If you need to register your child or additional children please do so today by emailing JWilliams@childrensdefense.org.

Proctor Participant Testimonials

"Last week I spent five days at Haley Farm in Clinton, Tennessee, as a participant in the 2015 Samuel Dewitt Proctor Child Advocacy Institute, which is sponsored by the Children’s Defense Fund. The Institute brings together social justice activists and child advocates from across the country along with some of the finest preachers in the land."

Catherine Meeks, 2015 participant

“There is only one place to meet other child advocates, learn spiritual and advocacy skills to help child advocates stand firm and effective on hallowed ground—the Children’s Defense Fund’s Proctor Institute for Child Advocacy Ministry.” 

Christine Kloker Young, participant since 2002

“Proctor is a loud voice in the wilderness that reminds me that grace abounds. It will inspire you and renew your hope and reassure your spirit of the fact that the world is in the capable hands of our young people.” 

First-time participant

“If you want the opportunity and the chance to meet, hear, and see history in the making, come to this Institute. It opens your mind, heart, and soul to issues you didn’t think were important or relevant and drives you do to more and better.” 

Joi Adams, first-time participant

“If you care about the plight of children and the future of this country you must come and learn to be an advocate for the rights of all God’s children!”

The Rev. Dr. Robert E. Walker, Jr.

“Haley is a place to rest and renew your spirit, challenge your faith, establish friendships with kindred spirits, hear great preaching, and then be ready and willing to go home and speak out and stand up for children!” 

Steve Wiard, nine-year participant