Samuel DeWitt Proctor Institute for Child Advocacy Ministry

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Join us July 17-21 for CDF's 2017 Samuel DeWitt Proctor Institute "Hope for Our Future: From Weeping to Working for Justice for Our Children."

Join clergy, seminarians, Christian educators, young adult leaders and other faith-based advocates for children for spiritual renewal, networking, movement-building workshops, and continuing education about the urgent needs of children at the intersection of race and poverty. Gain new inspiration, information, and ideas from preachers and noted plenary speakers who are making a difference to end child poverty and dismantle the Cradle to Prison PipelineTM. Come for an experience of Beloved Community and join in the intergenerational, interracial and multi-ethnic conversation with people who share your passion for justice for our nation’s children.

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Please click here for an at-a-glance overview of the week's schedule.

For early risers, there’s Meditations for the Journey with Dr. Frederick J. Streets before breakfast, then witness powerful preaching by the Rev. Dr. Otis Moss, Jr. and the Rev. Dr. Otis Moss, III at Morning Devotions accompanied by the joyous, rousing music of the Resurrection Choir. The morning continues with a thought-provoking Bible/Theological Study led by Dr. Eileen W. LindnerDr. Mark Taylor and Dr. Patrick Reyes, and Children and Justice Plenaries will get us thinking, talking and strategizing to make a positive difference for children. Tuesday’s plenary, “Where Are We? Poor Children in Rich America” will focus on ending child poverty with Dr. America Bracho, Sister Simone Campbell and others. Wednesday’s plenary, “Who Are We? Race, Class, and Power,” will focus on the intersections of race, class, and power with Brittany Packnett, Dr. Patrick Reyes, Dr. Mark Taylor and others. Thursday’s plenary, “What Have We Learned? Education and Our Children” will focus on challenges and opportunities for improving education, especially for children in poverty and children of color, in this new political context, with Dr. Wendy Puriefoy, Dr. Terrell Strayhorn and others. Each Children and Justice plenary will also feature the voices of young people. Choose from 24 interactive afternoon workshops to get equipped with new skills and strategies to build the movement for children. More than a dozen late afternoon choices include “Movement-building through the Arts” options (dance, music, visual arts, and spoken word) and more. Each evening concludes with the Great Preacher Series featuring Rev. Willie Francois IIRev. Damien Durr, Rev. Traci Blackmon, and Rev. Dr. Luke Powery. You won’t want to miss CDF president Marian Wright Edelman who will offer a welcoming Call at the beginning of the Institute. The week ends powerfully during the Friday Closing with Celebration, Communion, and Commitment with three concurrent organizing sessions, including one with Dr. Walter Fluker, author of The Ground Has Shifted, followed by a closing charge, celebration of our commitment, and a service of communion with Dr. Frederick Haynes preaching. The Friday closing will include a presentation by the children who participated in CDF's Proctor Freedom School and contributions by members of the late afternoon “Movement-Building through the Arts” sessions through music, dance, spoken word and visual arts. 

Learn more about the 2017 Great Preachers and Plenary Speakers.

About the 2017 Proctor Institute

Join 500 participants at the 2017 CDF Samuel DeWitt Proctor Institute for Child Advocacy Ministry to discover new insights, perspectives and crucial information that will equip you in your faithful work to end child poverty, dismantle the Cradle to Prison Pipeline™ and improve the lives of children.

Come for New Strategies, Skills, and Effective Models

Increase your advocacy and organizing skills, discover effective model programs that meet the needs of children, and deepen your understanding of how congregations may transform our communities to better nurture and protect all children in dynamic, interactive workshops. Participants may select three workshops (from more than 24 choices) to attend from 2:00 - 4:00 p.m. each day and then choose from a variety of late afternoon options From 4:15 - 6:00 p.m. Participants will also take action to advocate for children each day in the Action Center with computers and staff there to help make an immediate difference on pending legislation and other urgent matters.

Come with Your Family!

A special Proctor CDF Freedom Schools® Program for children ages five to 15 meets each full day of Proctor to engage children in activities, reading enrichment, and fun while parents and other caregivers are in plenary sessions and workshops. The Freedom School children will be participating in the leadership of the Friday morning closing worship and celebration of commitment.

Come for Seminary Credit

A Monday pre-session (9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.) and special sessions during the week are offered for seminarians of all ages, guided by CDF's Proctor faculty in residence. Seminarian students who are interested in registering for the credit-bearing graduate course should sign up through their seminaries and register at the discounted price of $200. There is an opportunity for scholarships on a first come first served basis. For more information on scholarships and course credit please contact Janet Wolf at jwolf@childrensdefense.org.

Come for an Experience of Beloved Community

Join in an intergenerational, interracial and multi-ethnic ecumenical community of people who share a passion in working for justice for our nation’s children. Together we will sing and talk and share meals and exchange ideas and strengthen ourselves and each other to carry on in our work. Your heart, mind, body and soul will be renewed and recharged for action, all in the serene setting of CDF Haley Farm in Clinton, Tennessee, once home to Roots author Alex Haley and now the spiritual home of the children’s movement. You might be able to get a little of this at a typical conference, a little of that at church, a bit of this at a revival, and bit of that at a training. But the Samuel DeWitt Proctor Institute for Child Advocacy Ministry is the one place that has it all, a unique experience that will leave you informed, inspired, equipped, connected, and ready to put your faith even more effectively into action to seek justice for our nation’s children and to build the next generation of leaders for the children’s movement. We hope you join us in 2017.

2017 Great Preachers and Plenary Speakers

   
DeMonte Alford
Children and Justice
Plenary Speaker
  Rev. Traci Blackmon
Wednesday Great Preacher
  Dr. America Bracho
Children and Justice
Plenary Speaker
         
 
 
Sister Simone Campbell
Children and Justice
Plenary Speaker
  Tai A. Dixon
Children and Justice
Plenary Moderator
  Rev. Damien Durr
Tuesday Great Preacher,
Children and Justice Plenary Speaker
         
 
 
Marian Wright Edelman
CDF President
  Oleta Garrett Fitzgerald
Children and Justice
Plenary Moderator
  Rev. Willie Francois, III
Monday Great Preacher
         
   
The Rev. Dr. Frederick D. Haynes
Closing Preacher
  The Rev. Dr. Eileen W. Lindner
Bible Study Leader
  The Rev. Dr. Otis Moss, III
Morning Devotions
Preacher
         
   
The Rev. Dr. Otis Moss Jr.
Morning Devotions
Preacher
  Brittany Packnett
Children and Justice
Plenary Speaker
  The Rev. Dr. Luke Powery
Great Preacher
         
   
Wendy Puriefoy
Children and Justice
Plenary Speaker
  Dr. Patrick Reyes
Children and Justice
Plenary Speaker
  E’darrius Smith
Children and Justice
Plenary Speaker
         
   
The Rev. Dr. Luther E.
Smith, Jr.

Children and Justice
Plenary Speaker
  Dr. Terrell Stayhorn
Children and Justice
Plenary Speaker
  Dr. Mark Taylor
Children and Justice
Plenary Speaker
         
Leadership: Proctor Institute

Rev. Shannon Daley-Harris

Proctor Institute Director

 

The Rev. Dr. Janet Wolf

Director of CDF Haley Farm and
Nonviolent Direct Action Organizing

     
 

The Rev. Dr. Otis Moss, III.

Proctor Co-Pastor-in-Residence

 

The Rev. Dr. Otis Moss, Jr.

Proctor Co-Pastor-in-Residence

     

Dr. Eli Wilson

Proctor Institute Director of Music

 

Mr. Don Lewis

Proctor Institute Organist

Rev. Will Gipson

Proctor Co-Chaplain-in-Residence

 

Dr. Frederick J. Streets

Proctor Co-Chaplain-in-Residence

 

The Rev. Dr. Eileen W. Lindner

Proctor Theologian-in-Residence

         
   
 
 

Ndume Olatushani

CDF Nonviolent Direct Action Organizing Team

       
2017 Schedule at a Glance
     Monday    Tuesday    Wednesday    Thursday    Friday
                     
Meditations for the Journey
7:15-8:30 a.m.
      The Rev. Dr. Frederick J. Streets   The Rev. Dr. Frederick J. Streets   The Rev. Dr. Frederick J. Streets    
                     
Morning Devotions
8:45-9:45 a.m.
  Seminarian Pre-Session 
10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. 
  The Rev. Dr. Otis Moss, III    The Rev. Dr. Otis Moss, Jr. &
The Rev. Dr. Otis Moss, III
  The Rev. Dr. Otis Moss, Jr.   Organizing Sessions
8:45 -9:45 a.m.

1. Ground Has Shifted
2. Children's Sabbaths
3. Intergenerational Conversation

                     
Bible/Theological Study
9:45-10:30 a.m.
      The Rev. Dr. Eileen W. Lindner   Dr. Mark Lewis Taylor   Dr. Patrick Reyes   The Rev. Dr. Frederick Haynes III
Closing Charge & Celebration of Worship & Commitment

10:00 -11:30 a.m.
                     
Break
10:30-11:00 a.m.
                   
                     
Children and Justice Plenary
11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m.
      Where Are We?
Poor Children in Rich America

Demonte AlfordDr. America Bracho
Sister Simone Campbell & Dr. Luther E. Smith, Jr.
  Who Are We?
Race, Class and Power

Brittany Packnett, Dr. Patrick Reyes & Dr. Mark Lewis Taylor
  What Have We Learned?
Education and Our Children

Rev. Damien Durr, E'darrius Smith
Dr. Terrell Strayhorn & Wendy Puriefoy
  Seminarian Post Session
11:30 a.m. -1:30 p.m.
                     
Advocacy Action
12:15-12:30 p.m.
      Advocacy Action   Advocacy Action   Advocacy Action    
                     
Lunch
12:30-1:45 p.m.
      Author Book-Signing
1:00-1:30 p.m. 
  Author Book-Signing
1:00-1:30 p.m.  
  Author Book-Signing
1:00-1:30 p.m.  
   
                     
Afternoon Workshops
2:00-4:00 p.m.
 

First-Timers Orientation, 
Screening: "Mr. Sceva and His Seven Sons"

  Click to View   Click to View    Click to View     
                     
Late Afternoon Options
4:15-6:00 p.m.
 

Guided Walking Tour of CDF Haley Farm Tour

  Click to View   Click to View   Click to View    
                     
Dinner
6:00-7:15 p.m.
                   
                     
Great Preachers Series
7:30-8:30 p.m.
  Welcome
Marian Wright Edelman
& Rev. Willie Francois III
  Rev. Damien Durr   Rev. Traci Blackmon   The Rev. Dr. Luke Powery    
                     
Optional Late Night Session
After worship-10:00 p.m.
      "Open-mic" & Intergenerational Conversation   "Open Mic" & Intergenerational Conversation    "Open Mic" & Intergenerational Conversation     
2017 Workshop Descriptions

Workshops are held from 2:00-4:00 p.m. on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. You may choose to take all three workshops offered within one "track" or you may select workshops from two or three different tracks. However, if a workshop is described as "Part 1 and Part 2" you are encouraged to register for both. This year, workshop selection is included in the initial on-line registration process so you may make your choices now.

Afternoon Workshop Descriptions

Trauma and Healing Track

This interactive three-day workshop will explore trauma theory and examine innovative approaches to care for traumatized children, youth and communities. In each session, master practitioners will share personal encounters and offer best practices on how to create transformative spaces for supporting traumatized individuals and communities. Utilizing signature Fearless Dialogues methods, presenters will utilize music, art, storytelling, journaling and small group exercises to stimulate heartfelt conversation on this sensitive subject.

TUESDAY: Healing with Traumatized Children

This workshop will explore how we collectively think about and regard children in religious communities, with particular focus on cultural practices and theological hermeneutics that have traditionally harmed children. Themes and issues explored will include child sexual abuse; physical violence against children; verbal, spiritual and religious malpractice involving children and youth ministries; recognizing and responding to childhood trauma; and instituting ways for clergy and adult laity to protect and keep children safe in the church and beyond.

Facilitated by Dr. Gregory C. Ellison II, Associate Professor of Pastoral Care and Counseling at Candler School of Theology, and author of Cut Dead but Still Alive: Caring for African American Youth; Ahmad Green-Hayes, inaugural cohort fellow of the Just Beginnings Collaborative whose project Children of Cohambee works to eradicate child sexual abuse in Black Churches; and Barbara Simpson-Epps, whose work engages others in creating system-wide, community-based and culturally specific approaches to address trauma.

WEDNESDAY: Healing with Traumatized Youths

This interactive workshop will explore trauma theory and examine innovative approaches to care for traumatized youths. Leaders will share personal encounters and offer best practices on how to create transformative spaces for supporting traumatized youths, and use signature Fearless Dialogues methods including music, art, storytelling, journaling and small group exercises to stimulate heartfelt conversation on this sensitive subject.

Facilitated by Rev. Damien Durr, Executive Pastor of Community Development, Friendship-West Baptist Church, Dallas, TX; Dr. Gregory C. Ellison II, Associate Professor of Pastoral Care and Counseling at Candler School of Theology, and author of Cut Dead but Still Alive: Caring for African American Youth; and Cadeem Gibbs, a Youth Advocate at the Brownsville Community Justice Center, mentor for PLOT for Youth and Young Men’s Initiative and staff writer and cofounder for injustice.in, a social justice media platform.

THURSDAY: Healing with Traumatized Communities: Transformative Justice

The third workshop of this track will focus on the impact of intergenerational trauma in both our family systems and communal historical memory. We will explore the different types of trauma a community experiences (individual, communal, systemic and historic) and learn how trauma can be passed down through both nature (epigenetics, biology) and nurture (parenting styles/communication). We will also look at tools for healing including somatic practices, memorial pilgrimages and art.

Facilitated by Dr. Gregory C. Ellison II, Associate Professor of Pastoral Care and Counseling at Candler School of Theology, and author of Cut Dead but Still Alive: Caring for African American Youth and Dr. Elaine Enns, Co-Director of Bartimaeus Cooperative Ministries and co-author of Ambassadors of Reconciliation: A New Testament Theology and Diverse Christian Practices of Restorative Justice and Peacemaking.

The Power of Truth Telling Track

TUESDAY: Preaching Social Justice

When Jesus told the disciples to go and make disciples of all nations, what did he really mean? This workshop will give you the courage to preach, teach and lead with a commitment to nonviolence and social transformation.

Facilitated by the Rev. Dr. Otis Moss, Jr., Proctor Co-Pastor-in-Residence.

WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY: Truth and Community Reconciliation (Parts I and II)

In this period of increasing social and economic inequities, confusion, oppression and division that are often propagated by falsehoods and distrust, communities around the world are exploring the use of truth-telling and healing initiatives to address entrenched challenges of racial and social inequities. As younger generations are faced with the responsibility of leadership in this difficult period, presenters will share stories of intergenerational organizing from their experiences in the movement’s past, present and very near future.

Greensboro, NC was the site of this country’s first Truth and Community Reconciliation Process (TRC). Growing from the tragic killing of five labor and community organizers by members of the Ku Klux Klan and the American Nazi Party, the pacesetting Greensboro TRC provides both inspiration and guidance for other localities facing deep social divides, resulting from police abuse of power, inequities in education, housing, employment, etc.

Organized by the Beloved Community Center with spiritual and technical support from the Archbishop Desmond Tutu of South Africa, the International Center for Transitional Justice, and a host of other local, state, national, and international partners, this session will guide workshop participants through the story of how an entire city, ravaged by racial and class divisions, moved from a tragic period to one of triumph for truth, justice, and human possibility.

A two-part workshop, Wednesday will focus on the causes, circumstances, sequence and organizing of the Greensboro TRC. Thursday will highlight the ongoing struggle to implement recommendations from the Greensboro TRC and explore the feasibility of TRC for other localities. These workshops are continually shaped by the urgent need for a culture of deep spiritual healing and a renewed sense of human dignity, worth and value.

Facilitated by Mrs. Joyce Hobson Johnson, Director of the Jubilee Institute of the Beloved Community Center of Greensboro, member of the Executive Committee of the NC NAACP, and co-chair of the National Council of Elders; the Rev. Dr. Nelson N. Johnson, Executive Director of the Beloved Community Center of Greensboro and one of the first 17 people arrested in the North Carolina Moral Monday Movement in 2013; and the Rev. Wesley J. Morris, Director of Beloved Organizing Training and Healing Institute (BOTHI), Beloved Community Center.


Nonviolent Direct Action Community Organizing Track

TUESDAY: Nonviolent Direct Action Community Organizing

Join this intergenerational, interactive learning and sharing session about the equity building power, principles and techniques of Nonviolent Direct Action Organizing, co-led by an intergenerational leadership team from the Beloved Community Center of Greensboro, NC. Workshop participants will learn the background and basics of Nonviolent Direct Action, including a sketch of its rich history in the social justice movement in the United States, an exploration of current models from the Beloved Community Center of Greensboro, the Forward Together Moral Monday Movement of North Carolina, and the New National Poor People’s Movement. The workshop will provide an affirmation of why Nonviolent Direct Action Organizing provides an enduring, sustainable path toward social transformation and building the beloved community.

Facilitated by Mrs. Joyce Hobson Johnson, Director of the Jubilee Institute of the Beloved Community Center of Greensboro, member of the Executive Committee of the NC NAACP, and co-chair of the National Council of Elders; the Rev. Dr. Nelson N. Johnson, Executive Director of the Beloved Community Center of Greensboro and one of the first 17 people arrested in the North Carolina Moral Monday Movement in 2013; and the Rev. Wesley J. Morris, Director of Beloved Organizing Training and Healing Institute (BOTHI), Beloved Community Center.

WEDNESDAY: Nonviolent Direct Action Organizing

This session will examine the historical and philosophical underpinnings of Nonviolent Direct Action and offer participants the opportunity to better understand Nonviolent Direct Action as an embodied way of being. Space will be provided to discuss and examine contemporary movements in light of the practice of non-violence.

Facilitated by Rev. Keith Caldwell, Director of the Urban EpiCenter in Nashville and pastor of Key Memorial United Methodist Church in Murfreesboro, TN and Rev. Gregory J. Edwards, founder and senior pastor of the Resurrected Life Community Church and CEO of the Resurrected Community Development Corporation, Allentown, PA.

THURSDAY: Nonviolent Direct Action Community Organizing for Ecojustice with Communities of Color

This session will be grounded in a theological meditation on Nonviolent Direct Action Organizing, engage participants in discussion about expressions of Nonviolent Direct Action concerning decolonization, climate catastrophe and environmental justice, and then open into a range of related issues and concerns.

Facilitated by Ched Myers, activist theologian, popular educator, author of many books, including Sabbath Economics and Binding the Strong Man, and partner in Bartimaeus Cooperative Ministries.


Education for Emancipation: From Sabbath Schools to Freedom Schools Track

TUESDAY: From Sabbath Schools to Freedom Schools: Christian Education and the Power of Voice

This workshop will demonstrate that, “The purpose of Christian Education is to set people free: free to be children of God and free to be co-creators with God.” We will unpack this statement by first exploring the theological anthropology that undergirds it and demonstrate how it’s been engaged historically and presently through the Sabbath schools of the Reconstruction Era, the Freedom Schools conducted during the Summer of 1964, and the Freedom Schools as they are run today through the work of the Children’s Defense Fund, and finally explore why this approach to Christian Education is important.

Facilitated by Dr. Reginald Blount, Assistant Professor of Formation, Youth and Culture at Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary and pastor of Arnett Chapel A.M.E. Church in Chicago, IL; and Dr. Virginia A. Lee, Associate Professor of Christian Education and Director of Deacon Studies, Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary.

WEDNESDAY: Freedom Schools: Bringing the Model to Your Campus

Considering bringing a CDF Freedom Schools®; Program to your college or seminary campus? This workshop will explore the steps Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary and Wake Forest Divinity School took to bring CDF Freedom Schools to their campus and share lessons learned to assist other campuses expand the reach of CDF Freedom Schools in their community. Specifically, we will walk through the experience of introducing the concept of CDF Freedom Schools and gaining support for this program at Wake Forest University. The workshop will highlight efforts to get departmental “buy in,” how we introduced the concept to the university’s cabinet administration, finding campus space to house the program for six weeks, our efforts to partner with other CDF Freedom Schools in our city, and securing internal (university) and external financial support. We will also explore how we targeted the children for our program.

Facilitated by Dr. Reginald Blount, Assistant Professor of Formation, Youth, and Culture at Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary and pastor of Arnett Chapel A.M.E. Church in Chicago, IL.; Dr. Derek Hicks, Wake Forest University School of Divinity, professor and author of Reclaiming Spirit in the Black Faith Tradition; Dr. Virginia A. Lee, Associate Professor of Christian Education and Director of Deacon Studies, Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary; and Ched Myers, activist theologian, popular educator, author of many books, including Sabbath Economics and Binding the Strong Man, and partner in Bartimaeus Cooperative Ministries.

THURSDAY: Freedom Schools as an Organizing Model for Nonviolent Direct Action

Participants in this session will learn how the CDF Freedom Schools®; Program and its pedagogy can be leveraged to interrupt oppressive environments and embody Nonviolent Direct Action Organizing.

Facilitated by Rev. Gregory J. Edwards, founder and senior pastor of the Resurrected Life Community Church and CEO of the Resurrected Community Development Corporation, Allentown, PA.

Transforming Congregations, Becoming Beloved Communities Track

TUESDAY: Nurturing Multicultural Congregations

Can churches become transformed into multicultural congregations with a passion for justice and a desire to live as a Beloved Community? How might two congregations, one urban and one suburban, create a partnership that nurtures multicultural relationships in worship and action? What are some of the tools that might make such transformations a reality? If you would like to be part of an interactive conversation with some people who have had those powerful experiences, if you would like to learn how to do congregational mapping, if you would like to explore the challenges to change, if you are hungry for new life in your ministries, please join us to explore the possibilities.

Facilitated by Rev. Patti Daley, Presbyterian minister who has pastored once-dwindling urban and suburban churches through growth into vibrant multicultural congregations; Rev. Karen Hernandez-Granzen, pastor of Westminster Presbyterian Church in Trenton, NJ, and contributor to Intercultural Ministry: Hope for a Changing World; and Elder Cherry Oakley, Executive Director of Support Coordination at Neighbours, Inc., leading a team of statewide facilitators that helps New Jerseyans with disabilities live a life that is self-determined and self-directed.

WEDNESDAY: Who Can I Run To?: The Quest to Make Congregations Places of Celebration and Safety for LGBTQ Youths

Houses of worship have the responsibility to encourage positive action, inspire life-bringing imagination, and facilitate stronger community bonds. Most importantly, congregations have a responsibility to serve as a safe haven for the most vulnerable. Sadly, congregations are frequently spaces where Queer young people meet violence, erasure and evil. How should congregations be better stewards of this responsibility? This workshop is an interactive, practice-oriented session geared towards establishing definitions, key issues, and opportunities for participating in building a better world sooner rather than later. Participants will leave this workshop with concrete steps to be more supportive to queer young people and families as people of faith.

Facilitated by Minister Candace Simpson, Faith and Justice Educator for the United Methodist Women.

THURSDAY: Redefining Prison Ministry from the Inside Out

In this interactive workshop, participants will reimagine, redesign and rethink prison ministry from the inside out. What would the church be if it were designed by, and with, those who are now caged? Through engaging facilitation, participants will expand their imagination about what prison ministry is, who it is for, and why reimagining it is absolutely necessary to living in a more just, humane and life-giving world.

Facilitated by Rahim Buford, partner with the CDF Nashville Organizing Team; Ndume Olatushani, consultant to the CDF Nashville Organizing Team; and Dr. Patrick Reyes.


Growing Strong Communities From The Grassroots Up Track

TUESDAY: Hope, Empowerment and Inclusion: Participatory Community Health Organizing

In this workshop participants will engage in group activities and dialogues that invite reflection about a community practice that honors inclusion and the right and obligation to improve our lives, communities and society in general. The group will discuss concepts such as community engagement with a strength-based approach, how to increase community participation, and the dominant paradigm as a model for exclusion, power and privilege. In addition participants will become familiar with the community worker model and the 18 core competencies that Latino Health Access considers to be key for an effective community practice rooted in principles of inclusion, justice, equity, strengths, hope and solidarity.

Facilitated by Dr. America Bracho, Executive Director, Latino Health Access.

WEDNESDAY: New Roots and Fresh Stop Markets: Cooperative Economics for Access to Good Food

A food justice movement is being cultivated across Kentucky, despite negative depictions of African-American communities as “food deserts.” Social innovators rooted in African-American cooperative economics are creating alternative food systems by harnessing their collective power. Their courageous work allows limited income families access to affordable, local produce and spaces for food democracy to flourish. Additionally, small farmers mutually benefit from guaranteed markets, fair prices and new community relationships. These leaders work intersectionally across rural and urban, class, race and income divides to cultivate a culture of food justice in their communities. This session is led by leaders of Fresh Stop Markets in Louisville who offer their love, hope and best practices for building food justice movements by and for our Black communities.

Facilitated by Joy Harris, Volunteer Leader, Farmer Liaison, and Chef Liaison with Fresh Stop Markets; Karyn Moskowitz, food justice organizer and co-founder and Executive Director of New Roots Fresh Stop Markets which she has operated since 2009; Anna Meeker, community leader in the Castlewood Neighborhood of Lexington and Fresh Stop Market Public Relations Liaison; Jeremy Porter, contemplative activist, Watershed Disciple, and Director of the Tweens Nutrition and Fitness Coalition; and Kristen Williams, member of the Food and Neighborhoods Committee in Louisville and children’s educator and volunteer with New Roots, Louisville, and the Shawnee Neighborhood Association.

THURSDAY: From the Fields: Walking with Farmworkers

The Coalition of Immokalee Workers (CIW) has been organizing migrant farmworkers and families for over 25 years. This workshop will share examples of popular education and art that have been used to transform working and living conditions for farmworkers and their families through the Fair Food Program. The CIW’s unique approach of organizing has brought people of faith to the forefront of their campaigns which have led 14 corporations, such as McDonalds, Walmart and Whole Foods to the table.

Facilitated by Gerado Reyes, a key leader of the Coalition of Immokalee Workers and a farmworker, and Brenda Perez, who currently coordinates the award-winning worker to worker education program of the Coalition of Immokalee Workers.


Improving The Odds For Our Children Now: Moving Forward, Not Backwards Track

TUESDAY: Ending Child Poverty Now

Ending Child Poverty Now will provide an update on our nation’s safety net — looking at Medicaid and other health coverage, nutrition and income supports that help move children out of poverty. We will review the threats facing children, but also steps to take together to move forward. We can’t go backwards! Bring to the table actions underway in your communities to reduce child poverty, keep children healthy, end hunger and homelessness, and increase income supports.

Facilitated by Dr. Luther E. Smith, Jr., Coordinator, Pan-Methodist Campaign for Children in Poverty; Michele Stillwell-Parvensky, Senior Policy and Government Affairs Manager, Children’s Defense Fund-California; and MaryLee Allen, Director of Policy, Children’s Defense Fund.

WEDNESDAY: Replacing the Cradle to Prison Pipeline®; Crisis with a Pipeline to Success

This session will make real America’s pipeline to prison, a trajectory that too often leads to marginalized lives, imprisonment and often premature death and lies at the intersection of race and poverty. The zero tolerance policies leading to the criminalization of children must be eliminated. The pipeline to prison must be dismantled and replaced with a pipeline to success for the sake of our children and our nation’s future. Share strategies for making that happen.

Facilitated by Ashley Moore, Policy Associate, Juvenile Justice and Staff Attorney, Children’s Defense Fund; Ndume Olatushani, Consultant to the CDF Nashville Organizing Team and MaryLee Allen, Director of Policy, Children’s Defense Fund.

THURSDAY: Leveling the Education Playing Field

This session will highlight opportunities for you to help all children succeed in school. There is much to push back against but some bright spots too. Learn how you as parents, faith leaders, youth leaders and other child advocates can strengthen the case for investments in early childhood and a quality education for every child. Ensure you have a seat at the table. Share struggles in your communities and effective strategies to push forward.

Facilitated by Rosazlia Grillier, Parent Peer Trainer, Community Organizing and Family Issues (COFI); Liz King, Senior Policy Analyst and Director of Education Policy, The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights and The Leadership Conference Education Fund; Gloria Sweet-Love, President, Tennessee NAACP; and Daniel Hains, Policy Associate, Early Childhood, Children’s Defense Fund.


Creating Change In Your Community Track

TUESDAY: CDF Freedom Schools®; Program

Come discover how you can host or involve your congregation or community in the CDF Freedom Schools®; movement. Participants will gain an overview of the concept and vision behind this successful summer and after-school enrichment program for children ages 5-18. The CDF Freedom Schools program integrates reading, conflict resolution and social action in an activity-based curriculum that promotes social, cultural and historical awareness.

Facilitated by Ella Baker Trainers Marie Bestman, Stefan Jones and Jessikha Williams; Shaquite Pegues, Director of Ella Baker Leadership Development and Sr. Program Associate, CDF Marlboro County; and Robin Sally, Director of Curriculum and Programs, CDF Freedom Schools®; program.

WEDNESDAY: Caged Youths Seeking Freedom: Partnering with Youth Currently and Formerly Caged to Dismantle Pipelines to Prison

“Those closest to the problem are closest to the solution.” – Glen E. Martin, Just Leadership, Founder

Often “outsiders” desiring to help caged youth in juvenile and prisons do not know where to begin. Listening to individuals currently caged and formerly caged and working with them to find solutions to disrupt and dismantle the Cradle to Prison Pipeline®; crisis is a necessary restorative practice. This is an interactive active workshop that invites participants into a dialogue about what it feels like to be caged as a youth, struggling to understand the meaning of life, justice, identity, community and trauma. Facilitators will share their real-life experiences as caged youth and explore questions about the meaning of prisons and justice, and the possibilities for disrupting and dismantling the pipeline to prison.

Facilitated by Eric Alexander, founding member of the Incarcerated Children’s Advocacy Network and Rahim Buford, partner with the CDF Nashville Organizing Team.

THURSDAY: Mobilizing Leaders for Healthy Communities of Color: Voices, Power, Promise

The chance to attain measurable improvements in the lives of youth of color is within grasp. Thanks to the commitment of leaders across sectors — faith based organizations, grassroots non-profits, civic champions and philanthropy — long-term, place-based efforts to catalyze systemic change are taking root in communities throughout the country. Designed to advance equity through policy and systems change, the Sacramento County Steering Committee on the Reduction of African American Child Deaths (RAACD) initiative managed by Sierra Health Foundation provides a powerful model for understanding and driving systemic and lasting change within a burgeoning field. The RAACD Steering Committee’s efforts focus on four issue areas: 1) Homicide related to Child Abuse and Neglect; 2) Third Party Homicide; 3) Deaths related to Perinatal Conditions; and 4) Infant Sleep Related Deaths. In this session participants will learn about the recognition of and investment in improving the significant disparities in health and life outcomes for African American children in Sacramento County and the philanthropic mobilization efforts that led to an eight million dollar reallocation of public funding and a five-year strategic plan. Participants will learn about successful models of intentional capacity, partnership and power building in vulnerable communities that have translated into local, regional and statewide policy change.

Facilitated by Kindra F. Montgomery-Block, Program Officer for the Sierra Health Foundation, Sacramento, CA.

Special Opportunities for Seminarians

Seminarians who participate in CDF's Samuel DeWitt Proctor Institute for Child Advocacy Ministry for course credit will attend the Seminarian Pre-Session on Monday July 17th from 9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. and will meet with our 2017 Proctor Professors-in-Residence each afternoon from 4:15 p.m. to 6:00p.m. to discuss and reflect on the day's sessions and for further engagement. Seminary students who are interested in registering for the credit-bearing graduate course should sign up through their seminaries and register at the discounted price of $200.00 here.  

There is an opportunity for scholarships on a first come first serve basis. For more information on scholarships and course credit please contact Janet Wolf at jwolf@childrensdefense.org

Sign up and register for the 23rd Annual Samuel DeWitt Proctor Institute and Child Advocacy Ministry.

Teaching Faculty

Dr. Leah Gunning Francis

Vice President of Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty, Christian Theological Seminary, author: Ferguson and Faith: Sparking Leadership and Awakening Community.

 

Rev. Dr. Patrick Reyes

Director of Strategic Partnership for Doctoral Initiatives, Forum for Theological Exploration, author of Nobody Cries When We Die: God, Community and Surviving to Adulthood.
     

Rev. Dr. Janet Wolf

Children's Defense Fund
(615) 260-2894

   
     

Faculty Co-Facilitators

Rev. Dr. Gregory Ellison

Candler School of Theology, professor and author, Cut Dead but Still Alive: Caring for African American Youth;

 

Rev. Dr. Derek Hicks

Wake Forest University School of Divinity, professor and author, Reclaiming Spirit in the Black Faith Tradition;

     

Ched Myers

Activist Theolgian, popular educator, author of many books, including Sabbath Economics and Binding the Strong Man; partner in Bartimaeus Cooperative Ministries, 5th generatiion Californian.
 

Rev. Dr. Christophe Ringer

Chicago Theological Seminary, professor and former pastor, author of Necropolitics: The Religious Situation of U.S. Mass Incarceration.
     

Rev. Dr. Rodney Sadler

Associate Professor of Bible, Union Presbyterian Seminary at Charlotte; associate pastor, Mount Carmel Baptist Church.
 

Dr. Charlene Sinclair

Union Theological Seminary, and founding director of the Ceneter for Race, Religion and Economic Democracy.
Special Opportunities for Children

About the Proctor Institute CDF Freedom Schools® Program

Children ages five through 15 who have pre-registered will participate in the abbreviated CDF Freedom Schools program during the three full days of the 23rd Samuel DeWitt Proctor Institute for Child Advocacy Ministry. Please contact spegues@childrensdefense.org or complete this form if you need to register your child/children.

Pre-Registration

Children must have pre-registered by July 1st to participate in the Proctor Institute CDF Freedom Schools. There will be no on-site registration for children who participate in the Freedom Schools program. Staff numbers are determined based on pre-registration and we will not have the capacity to serve additional children safely. Please contact spegues@childrensdefense.org or complete this form if you need to register your child/children.

Days and Hours

The Proctor CDF Freedom Schools program is held on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, and begins at 8:45 a.m. and concludes at 4:00 p.m. (this schedule is designed to enable parents or other caregivers to participate fully in the morning plenaries and in the afternoon workshops). Children are invited and encouraged to accompany their parents or caregivers to evening worship. The Freedom Schools children will be developing a presentation that will be part of the Friday morning closing worship, charge, and celebration of our communion that concludes at 11:30 a.m.

Staying Cool

The CDF Freedom Schools program will include outdoor activities and play. Please be sure your child has the proper sunscreen, hat and clothing for the weather. Children may have the opportunity to play in the sprinkler or enjoy other water fun, so please send them with a bathing suit and towel or an extra set of clothes each day.

Leadership

The Proctor Institute CDF Freedom Schools site is led by Servant Leaders who are Ella Baker Trainers (EBTs). EBTs are an extension to the national staff and aid in the successful implementation of the CDF Freedom Schools program. EBTs help to facilitate training, especially on the Integrated Reading Curriculum, to Executive and Project Directors, Site Coordinators and college-aged Servant Leader Interns. Your children will be in caring and capable hands for these rich and fun-filled days.

Logistics: Proctor Institute for Child Advocacy

Arrivals 

CDF's Proctor Institute begins on Monday, July 17, with a pre-session for seminarians from 9:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Registration opens at noon and lunch will be available for early arrivals. Orientation for first-time participants begins at 2:00 p.m., a guided walking tour of CDF Haley Farm is offered at 4:00 p.m., choir rehearsal for any interested singers begins at 5:15 p.m., and dinner is at 6:00 p.m. The formal start of CDF's Proctor Institute is at 7:00 p.m. with a welcoming address by CDF President Marian Wright Edelman followed by the opening of the Great Preachers Series.

Departures

CDF's Proctor Institute will conclude on Friday, July 21st at 11:30 a.m. (seminarians have a post-session that will conclude at 1:30 p.m. on Friday). Allow at least two hours from your CDF Haley Farm departure until your flight’s departure time (this includes shuttle schedule and the recommended hour for check-in). We encourage you to schedule a flight that will allow you to remain through the closing. You won’t want to miss this special culmination of the week. Please contact Ken Libby at KLibby@childrensdefense.org or use this form to provide your travel and accommodations information when your plans are finalized.

Transportation 

If you will be flying, you should book your flight to McGhee Tyson Airport in Knoxville, Tennessee. CDF provides round-trip airport shuttle service from McGhee Tyson Airport to CDF Haley Farm for a fee of $60. If you will be driving to CDF's Proctor Institute, you can find driving directions at www.haleyfarm.org. There is ample free parking at CDF Haley Farm.

Housing

You will need to make your own arrangements for lodging during the week. 
The recommended hotels in Clinton, Tenn. are listed below. Please call the hotel directly and indicate that you are a Proctor Institute participant. Special rates are available for reservations confirmed by July 1, 2017. A free CDF shuttle will transport participants between these hotels and CDF Haley Farm. Some participants enjoy the short walk between these hotels and CDF Haley Farm.

  • Baymont Inn & Suites (865) 457-4311
  • Quality Inn (865) 457-2255
  • Hampton Inn (865) 691-8070
  • Holiday Inn Express (865) 457-2233
  • Super 8 (865) 457-2311

CDF Freedom Schools Pre-Registration

Children must have pre-registered by July 1st to participate in the Proctor Institute CDF Freedom Schools program. There is no on-site registration for children who participate in the Freedom Schools program, staff numbers are determined based on pre-registration and we will not have the capacity to serve additional children safely. If you need to register your child or additional children please do so today by emailing spegues@childrensdefense.org or complete this CDF Freedom Schools Registration form.

Cancellation Policy

Cancellations submitted in writing, postmarked or faxed on or before June 27 will be refunded, less a $50 processing fee. Cancellations postmarked June 28–July 8 will be refunded $75. No refund of registration fee is possible for cancellations postmarked or faxed after July 8, 2017. Registrations may, however, be transferred to another name but not to another year.

Proctor Participant Testimonials

“There is only one place to meet other child advocates, learn spiritual and advocacy skills to help child advocates stand firm and effective on hallowed ground—the Children’s Defense Fund’s Proctor Institute for Child Advocacy Ministry.” 

Christine Kloker Young, participant since 2002

“Proctor is a loud voice in the wilderness that reminds me that grace abounds. It will inspire you and renew your hope and reassure your spirit of the fact that the world is in the capable hands of our young people.” 

First-time participant

“If you want the opportunity and the chance to meet, hear, and see history in the making, come to this Institute. It opens your mind, heart, and soul to issues you didn’t think were important or relevant and drives you do to more and better.” 

Joi Adams, first-time participant

“If you care about the plight of children and the future of this country you must come and learn to be an advocate for the rights of all God’s children!”

The Rev. Dr. Robert E. Walker, Jr.

“Haley is a place to rest and renew your spirit, challenge your faith, establish friendships with kindred spirits, hear great preaching, and then be ready and willing to go home and speak out and stand up for children!” 

Steve Wiard, nine-year participant