Children's Health Data

CDF publications relevant to Children's Health

What Does A Medicaid Block Grant or Per Capita Cap Mean for Children and Families

Thanks to Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) and the health insurance marketplace, today more than 95 percent of children in America have health coverage. Medicaid is lean and efficient, serving millions of low-income children, pregnant women, children and adults with disabilities, and seniors. Children constitute 43 percent of all enrollees. Without Medicaid’s strong protections, coverage guarantee, and comprehensive, age-appropriate health and mental health coverage, many children would go uninsured or underinsured, increasing short and long term costs for states and local communities while jeopardizing children’s academic performance and their futures. Our nation’s leaders must reject structural changes and cuts to Medicaid that would undermine its critical protections, hard-earned coverage and resulting health gains for children made over more than 50 years.

January 4, 2017

Children's Health Groups Letter to Leadership.pdf

As organizations dedicated to improving the health and well-being of children, adolescents, and pregnant women, we urge you to keep the unique needs of children in mind as you consider the future of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and ensure that any changes do no harm to children. Thanks to Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) and the ACA, ninety-five percent of children in the United States have health coverage – an historic high. Children must not lose ground: any health reforms must build on achievements already made to further improve coverage for children. We look forward to working with you to ensure no child is worse off as changes to our health care system are contemplated, and that we can work together to make even more progress for children.

January 3, 2017

Medicaid Primer

Thanks in large part to Medicaid and its partner, the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), more than 95 percent of all children in American now have health insurance. Medicaid is a lean, efficient program that has historically served primarily low-income children and seniors, and children and adults with disabilities, such as Down syndrome. Forty-three percent of all Medicaid beneficiaries are children. Without Medicaid’s strong protections, coverage guarantee and comprehensive, age-appropriate health and mental health coverage, millions of children would go uninsured or underinsured, substantially increasing short and long term costs for states and local communities while jeopardizing children’s futures. Children who are insured are more likely than their uninsured counterparts to be healthy, graduate from high school, attend college and earn more/pay more taxes as adults. As our nation’s leaders make critical decisions about America’s future, Medicaid must remain exempt from structural changes or cuts that would undermine its ability to serve children and other vulnerable populations.

January 4, 2017

Protect the ACA for Children and Families

Since the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was enacted in 2010, 20 million people previously uninsured have gained health coverage. Under the ACA, millions of children and adults are now receiving preventive services such as immunizations at no cost, and can no longer be denied coverage because of pre-existing conditions or face lifetime limits on coverage. Women can no longer be charged more for coverage than men and states cannot cut or scale back health coverage for children. Most Americans, regardless of source of coverage, have seen significant new protections under the ACA. All of this is at risk if the ACA is repealed.

January 4, 2017

Congress Must Not Repeal the Affordable Care Act without a Replacement That Protects Children and Families

Republican congressional leaders have stated their intent to move quickly in early January to repeal as much of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) as they can without enacting a full replacement plan immediately. This action would result in loss of coverage for millions who gained affordable health coverage through the ACA and would destabilize the entire individual health care market.

January 4, 2017

Child Poverty in America 2015 National FactSheet

Poverty data released by the U.S. Census Bureau on September 13, 2016 reveal child poverty declined last year to 14.5 million poor children, one million fewer than in 2014, but still higher than before the recession began in 2007.

September 13, 2016

New Data Showing Drop of 60600 Uninsured Children

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Children’s Defense Fund (CDF) President Marian Wright Edelman issued the following statement today in response to the U.S. Census Bureau’s release of data showing that in 2015 nearly 3.9 million children under age 18 were uninsured compared to 4.5 million children in 2014, which means 606,000 more children were insured. The number of uninsured children in the U.S. is at a historic low.

September 13, 2016

Obama Administration Encourages Schools and Districts to Enroll Students in Healthcare Coverage through School Registration

As students begin the new school year, the U.S. Department of Education and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services are calling on states and districts to help enroll students in healthcare coverage during school registration processes and ensure students have access to the health coverage they need.

August 31, 2016

U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services to Discuss How Schools and Districts Can Enroll Students in Health Coverage through School Registration

U.S. Secretary of Education John B. King Jr. and U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Sylvia Mathews Burwell will participate in a school-based health enrollment event in Washington, D.C. at Cardozo Education Campus on Wednesday, Aug. 31. They will join a roundtable with Marian Wright Edelman, president of the Children’s Defense Fund; Daniel A. Domenech, executive director of AASA, The School Superintendents Association; Kaya Henderson, chancellor of District of Columbia Public Schools and local health and education leaders.

August 31, 2016

2015-children-in-the-states-complete

State data released by the U.S. Census Bureau on September 17, 2015 reveal that child poverty in 2014 remains at record high levels in the states. Children are the poorest age group, and the poorest are children of color and those under age six.

October 28, 2015

Child Poverty in America 2014 State Fact Sheet

State data released by the U.S. Census Bureau on September 17, 2015 reveal that child poverty in 2014 remains at record high levels in the states. Children are the poorest age group, and the poorest are children of color and those under age six.

September 22, 2015

Child Poverty in America 2014 National Fact Sheet

Poverty data released by the U.S. Census Bureau on September 16, 2015 reveal that child poverty declined slightly in 2014, from 21.5 percent in 2013 to 21.1 percent in 2014. While child poverty rates declined for Hispanic, White and Asian children, Black children saw an increase and continue to have the highest child poverty rate. Despite some decreases child poverty among all children remains at shamefully high levels. One in five children – 15.5 million – were poor in 2014, and children remain the poorest age group in the country.

September 17, 2015

Poverty Hurts Children, Yet More Than One in Five Children in America Lives in Poverty; Black Child Poverty Increases 10 Percent

September 16, 2015

NCH Invited Written Testimony Marian Wright Edelman

July 30, 2015

The Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid Expansion Helps Adults and Children

A key element of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was the requirement that states expand eligibility for Medicaid to 138 percent of the federal poverty level to cover more children and low-income adults, a requirement which became an option for states after a U.S. Supreme Court decision in June 2012. As of July 20, 2015, 30 states and the District of Columbia have taken this option, expanding affordable health coverage to more than 10 million low-income Americans and reducing the rate of uninsurance nationwide from 17.6 percent to 10.1 percent.

The Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid Expansion Helps Adults and Children

A key element of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was the requirement that states expand eligibility for Medicaid to 138 percent of the federal poverty level to cover more children and low-income adults, a requirement which became an option for states after a U.S. Supreme Court decision in June 2012. As of July 20, 2015, 30 states and the District of Columbia have taken this option, expanding affordable health coverage to more than 10 million low-income Americans and reducing the rate of uninsurance nationwide from 17.6 percent to 10.1 percent.

Medicaid Primer - July 2015

Fifty years ago, on July 30, 1965, President Lyndon Johnson signed legislation creating Medicaid for "protection or security against the economic effects of sickness," and for fifty years, Medicaid has done just that for millions of children and low-income families across America.

Medicaid Primer - July 2015

Fifty years ago, on July 30, 1965, President Lyndon Johnson signed legislation creating Medicaid for "protection or security against the economic effects of sickness," and for fifty years, Medicaid has done just that for millions of children and low-income families across America.

Top Ten Reasons to Expand Medicaid

Since January 2014, 30 states and the District of Columbia have taken the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) option to expand Medicaid to adults with incomes at or below 138 percent of the federal poverty level (FPL) ($32,913 for a family of four in 2014). All of those states have seen dramatic reductions in their uninsured population and other benefits to children, individuals, families, and communities.

Top Ten Reasons to Expand Medicaid

Since January 2014, 30 states and the District of Columbia have taken the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) option to expand Medicaid to adults with incomes at or below 138 percent of the federal poverty level (FPL) ($32,913 for a family of four in 2014).i All of those states have seen dramatic reductions in their uninsured population and other benefits to children, individuals, families, and communities.