Data and Publications

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Petition for Rulemaking

Federal data sources and CDF publications relevant to child health.

What Does A Medicaid Block Grant or Per Capita Cap Mean for Children and Families

Thanks to Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) and the health insurance marketplace, today more than 95 percent of children in America have health coverage. Medicaid is lean and efficient, serving millions of low-income children, pregnant women, children and adults with disabilities, and seniors. Children constitute 43 percent of all enrollees. Without Medicaid’s strong protections, coverage guarantee, and comprehensive, age-appropriate health and mental health coverage, many children would go uninsured or underinsured, increasing short and long term costs for states and local communities while jeopardizing children’s academic performance and their futures. Our nation’s leaders must reject structural changes and cuts to Medicaid that would undermine its critical protections, hard-earned coverage and resulting health gains for children made over more than 50 years.

January 4, 2017

Children's Health Groups Letter to Leadership.pdf

As organizations dedicated to improving the health and well-being of children, adolescents, and pregnant women, we urge you to keep the unique needs of children in mind as you consider the future of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and ensure that any changes do no harm to children. Thanks to Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) and the ACA, ninety-five percent of children in the United States have health coverage – an historic high. Children must not lose ground: any health reforms must build on achievements already made to further improve coverage for children. We look forward to working with you to ensure no child is worse off as changes to our health care system are contemplated, and that we can work together to make even more progress for children.

January 3, 2017

Medicaid Primer

Thanks in large part to Medicaid and its partner, the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), more than 95 percent of all children in American now have health insurance. Medicaid is a lean, efficient program that has historically served primarily low-income children and seniors, and children and adults with disabilities, such as Down syndrome. Forty-three percent of all Medicaid beneficiaries are children. Without Medicaid’s strong protections, coverage guarantee and comprehensive, age-appropriate health and mental health coverage, millions of children would go uninsured or underinsured, substantially increasing short and long term costs for states and local communities while jeopardizing children’s futures. Children who are insured are more likely than their uninsured counterparts to be healthy, graduate from high school, attend college and earn more/pay more taxes as adults. As our nation’s leaders make critical decisions about America’s future, Medicaid must remain exempt from structural changes or cuts that would undermine its ability to serve children and other vulnerable populations.

January 4, 2017

Protect the ACA for Children and Families

Since the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was enacted in 2010, 20 million people previously uninsured have gained health coverage. Under the ACA, millions of children and adults are now receiving preventive services such as immunizations at no cost, and can no longer be denied coverage because of pre-existing conditions or face lifetime limits on coverage. Women can no longer be charged more for coverage than men and states cannot cut or scale back health coverage for children. Most Americans, regardless of source of coverage, have seen significant new protections under the ACA. All of this is at risk if the ACA is repealed.

January 4, 2017

Congress Must Not Repeal the Affordable Care Act without a Replacement That Protects Children and Families

Republican congressional leaders have stated their intent to move quickly in early January to repeal as much of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) as they can without enacting a full replacement plan immediately. This action would result in loss of coverage for millions who gained affordable health coverage through the ACA and would destabilize the entire individual health care market.

January 4, 2017

Child Poverty in America 2015 National FactSheet

Poverty data released by the U.S. Census Bureau on September 13, 2016 reveal child poverty declined last year to 14.5 million poor children, one million fewer than in 2014, but still higher than before the recession began in 2007.

September 13, 2016

2015-children-in-the-states-complete

State data released by the U.S. Census Bureau on September 17, 2015 reveal that child poverty in 2014 remains at record high levels in the states. Children are the poorest age group, and the poorest are children of color and those under age six.

October 28, 2015

Child Poverty in America 2014 State Fact Sheet

State data released by the U.S. Census Bureau on September 17, 2015 reveal that child poverty in 2014 remains at record high levels in the states. Children are the poorest age group, and the poorest are children of color and those under age six.

September 22, 2015

Child Poverty in America 2014 National Fact Sheet

Poverty data released by the U.S. Census Bureau on September 16, 2015 reveal that child poverty declined slightly in 2014, from 21.5 percent in 2013 to 21.1 percent in 2014. While child poverty rates declined for Hispanic, White and Asian children, Black children saw an increase and continue to have the highest child poverty rate. Despite some decreases child poverty among all children remains at shamefully high levels. One in five children – 15.5 million – were poor in 2014, and children remain the poorest age group in the country.

September 17, 2015

NCH Invited Written Testimony Marian Wright Edelman

July 30, 2015

More Children's Health Data