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Federal data sources and CDF publications relevant to child health.

Child Poverty in America 2015 National FactSheet

Poverty data released by the U.S. Census Bureau on September 13, 2016 reveal child poverty declined last year to 14.5 million poor children, one million fewer than in 2014, but still higher than before the recession began in 2007.

September 13, 2016

2015-children-in-the-states-complete

State data released by the U.S. Census Bureau on September 17, 2015 reveal that child poverty in 2014 remains at record high levels in the states. Children are the poorest age group, and the poorest are children of color and those under age six.

October 28, 2015

Child Poverty in America 2014 State Fact Sheet

State data released by the U.S. Census Bureau on September 17, 2015 reveal that child poverty in 2014 remains at record high levels in the states. Children are the poorest age group, and the poorest are children of color and those under age six.

September 22, 2015

Child Poverty in America 2014 National Fact Sheet

Poverty data released by the U.S. Census Bureau on September 16, 2015 reveal that child poverty declined slightly in 2014, from 21.5 percent in 2013 to 21.1 percent in 2014. While child poverty rates declined for Hispanic, White and Asian children, Black children saw an increase and continue to have the highest child poverty rate. Despite some decreases child poverty among all children remains at shamefully high levels. One in five children – 15.5 million – were poor in 2014, and children remain the poorest age group in the country.

September 17, 2015

NCH Invited Written Testimony Marian Wright Edelman

July 30, 2015

The Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid Expansion Helps Adults and Children

A key element of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was the requirement that states expand eligibility for Medicaid to 138 percent of the federal poverty level to cover more children and low-income adults, a requirement which became an option for states after a U.S. Supreme Court decision in June 2012. As of July 20, 2015, 30 states and the District of Columbia have taken this option, expanding affordable health coverage to more than 10 million low-income Americans and reducing the rate of uninsurance nationwide from 17.6 percent to 10.1 percent.

Medicaid Primer - July 2015

Fifty years ago, on July 30, 1965, President Lyndon Johnson signed legislation creating Medicaid for "protection or security against the economic effects of sickness," and for fifty years, Medicaid has done just that for millions of children and low-income families across America.

Top Ten Reasons to Expand Medicaid

Since January 2014, 30 states and the District of Columbia have taken the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) option to expand Medicaid to adults with incomes at or below 138 percent of the federal poverty level (FPL) ($32,913 for a family of four in 2014).i All of those states have seen dramatic reductions in their uninsured population and other benefits to children, individuals, families, and communities.

FY2016 House and Senate Budget Fact Sheet

Ending Child Poverty Now

For the first time, this report shows that by investing an additional 2 percent of the federal budget into existing programs and policies that increase employment, make work pay, and ensure children’s basic needs are met, the nation could reduce child poverty by 60 percent and lift 6.6 million children out of poverty.

January 28, 2015

More Children's Health Data