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Marian Wright Edelman's Child Watch® Columns

Marian Wright Edelman

Marian Wright Edelman is a lifelong advocate for disadvantaged Americans and is the President of CDF. Under her leadership, CDF has become the nation's strongest voice for children and families.

Her Child Watch column is sent every Friday to subscribers and posted to The Huffington Post weekly.


Child Watch Column Archives

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  • 01/07/11
    Child Watch® Column: "Health Reform Under Threat"
    In 2010, there was finally good news for millions of uninsured children and families when the President and Congress took a major step towards ensuring affordable and comprehensive health coverage for millions of children and families in America. With the passage of The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (the Affordable Care Act), more than 35 million Americans including more than 95 percent of children will have access to the critical health coverage they need to survive and thrive.
  • 12/31/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Celebrating Kwanzaa, Celebrating Community"
    The New Year is marked with many kinds of celebrations, but for Black families and communities who celebrate Kwanzaa from December 26-January 1, every New Year's Day marks a renewed dedication to community. Kwanzaa is a unique celebration because it is not a religious or a national holiday but a cultural one, and it doesn't celebrate a person or an event but a set of ideas.
  • 12/24/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Two Christmas Eve Lessons"
    In the story shared with me about my dear friend Bill Coffin, it was Christmas Eve and the pews at New York City's Riverside Church were packed. The Christmas pageant was underway and had come to the point at which the innkeeper was to turn away Mary and Joseph with the resounding line, "There's no room at the inn!"
  • 12/17/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Give the Gift of Caring and Sharing This Season"
    The average American family spends hundreds of dollars on gifts during this season. It's wonderful to share special times and gifts with friends and family, but for many adults this holy season has been commercialized and become defined by shopping for the "in" toys, clothes, and other material gifts we think our children want. And while it's fine to give children these things when we can, we should never forget to give them the more important gifts of ourselves—our time, attention, and family rituals—that children need.
  • 12/10/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Strength to Love: A Challenge to the Privatized Prison Industry"
    A few months ago a group of earnest and determined stockholders traveled together by bus from Washington, D.C. to Nashville, Tennessee to attend a shareholders' meeting. On the surface, it sounded like a fairly ordinary trip, but this was an unusual group on an extraordinary mission.
  • 12/03/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Twenty Years of Beating the Odds"
    How does a child endure unspeakable hardship and still manage to succeed? What does it mean to save rather than give up on a child? When you read the stories of the Children's Defense Fund (CDF)'s Beat the Odds® award recipients, you'll find the answers. Too often we hear about teens getting into trouble, dropping out of school, getting involved with drugs, crime, and gangs, or becoming parents too soon.
  • 11/23/10
    Child Watch® Column: "A Thanksgiving Day Prayer to End Poverty in All Its Forms in Our Rich Land"
    In this Thanksgiving week of 2010, when 15.5 million children are living in poverty – many hungry and homeless; when the gap between rich and poor is the highest ever; when the very richest Americans have reaped a huge tax windfall from the Bush tax cuts and some political leaders want to give them more; and when, incredibly, some political leaders are playing politics with the very survival of our children and earth in our nuclear saturated world by blocking immediate passage of the START treaty to control nuclear weapons, I hope we will pray for an end to child poverty in all of its forms.
  • 11/19/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Hunger in a Season of Plenty"
    "It's dinner time in America. But for 1 in 4 children, you'd never know it." The ad with the simple image of an empty plate is meant to catch your eye—especially if you came across it in the November issue of a favorite magazine, tucked among the tips for a traditional Thanksgiving feast.
  • 11/12/10
    Child Watch® Column: "The Threat of Persistent Poverty"
    Recent reports state that more Americans are now living in poverty in the suburbs than in cities—a trend that has increased dramatically during the recession. At the same time, there has been an increase in the number of families who once donated to food pantries or other organizations serving the poor who now need to turn to these same places for help themselves.
  • 11/05/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Stop the Bullying!"
    The problem of bullying in our nation's schools has been in the headlines again, in large part because of a heartbreaking series of recent tragedies: children and youths who took their lives after they were bullied or harassed because their peers believed they were gay. We need to immediately send a clear message to all our children that bullying and harassment for this or any other reason is simply not acceptable.
  • 10/29/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Reverend Solomon Jackson, Jr.: Blessed to Be a Blessing"
    Many faith communities around the country have just held their annual National Observance of Children's Sabbaths® celebrations, an event coordinated every October by the Children's Defense Fund. It encourages congregations of all faiths to consider how they can respond to the Divine mandate to nurture, protect, and ensure justice for all children.
  • 10/22/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Children Can't Vote But You Can – And Must"
    But any voter who isn't enthusiastic about the ability to place a vote and have a say in these midterm elections for local, state, and national leaders is shirking their responsibility and wasting a huge opportunity others have struggled and died for. Those of us who participated in and lived through the Civil Rights Movement know firsthand that the right to vote is something Black Americans were fighting and dying for not very long ago.
  • 10/15/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Celebrating the Children's Sabbath"
    Across the country, thousands of people of faith are coming together right now to advocate for children in need through National Observance of Children's Sabbaths® celebrations. This annual celebration, held every third weekend in October, provides a time for faith communities to strengthen their existing efforts for children, discover new opportunities, and respond to the Divine mandate to nurture, protect, and advocate for all children.
  • 10/08/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Seizing an Opportunity in Education Reform"
    As America's children headed back to school in September, President Obama delivered a televised back-to-school address to the nation's students from the Julia R. Masterman School in Philadelphia, an acclaimed public magnet school for fifth through twelfth graders. He spoke about the importance of hard work—a lesson his own mother was quick to drill into him as soon as she sensed his effort level in high school was starting to hit a slump.
  • 10/01/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Remembering Varnette Honeywood"
    Artist Varnette Honeywood had a clear vision of how she perceived Black people and families and a gift for sharing her joyful, colorful perspective with the rest of the world. She was a dear friend to the Children's Defense Fund and the illustrator and creator of our beautiful logo for the Black Community Crusade for Children's Leave No Child Behind® movement. Her death in September at age 59 was a sad loss for all of us.
  • 09/24/10
    Child Watch® Column: "As Millions More Children Are Affected By Poverty, Now is the Time for Our Nation to Act"
    Nearly four million more Americans fell into poverty in 2009: 44 million or one in seven of us are unable to meet our basic needs. Worst of all, children, our most vulnerable group, experienced the steepest rise in poverty and the largest single-year increase since the 1960s.
  • 09/17/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Getting All Children the Schools They Deserve"
    As a new academic year starts, children around the country are going back to school and settling into new classes. Meanwhile, parents, educators, policy experts, and politicians are gearing up again to monitor and measure student learning—and preparing to ask the hard questions about whether or not the children in their care are getting the best possible education.
  • 09/10/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Jefferson Thomas and the Courage of Children"
    "[Jefferson] Thomas was just a teenager when he became one of the first African-American students to enroll in Little Rock Central High School. Yet even at such a young age, he had the courage to risk his own safety, to defy a governor and a mob, and to walk proudly into that school even though it would have been far easier to give up and turn back. And through this simple act of pursuing an equal education, he and his fellow members of the Little Rock Nine helped open the doors of opportunity for their generation and for those that followed."
  • 09/03/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Gun Violence and Children: Have We No Shame or Respect for Child Life?"
    . The Children's Defense Fund (CDF) has documented the threat of gun violence against American children for nearly two decades since we learned in a Peter Hart Associates poll undertaken by CDF's Black Community Crusade for Children that the number one concern of Black adults and youths was gun violence. So many in both generations feared they or their children would never reach adulthood because of pervasive gun violence.
  • 08/27/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Katrina, Five Years Later"
    Five years later, for many of Katrina's children and families home is still not back to the way it was. New roadblocks keep appearing on the road to recovery. The city's resilience is still strong, but challenges remain.
  • 08/20/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Children Need Emergency Help in this Deep Recession Now!"
    Children have only one childhood and it is right now. Millions of children in our nation require emergency attention in our recession ravaged economy as poverty, including extreme child poverty, hunger, and homelessness have increased, if irreparable harm is not to be inflicted on them and on our nation's future.
  • 08/13/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Changing the Status Quo in Our Schools"
    In late July, both President Obama and Secretary of Education Arne Duncan spoke to the National Urban League's Centennial Conference about what the President called "an issue that I believe will largely determine not only African American success, but the success of our nation in the 21st century -- and that is whether we are offering our children the very best education possible." Right now, of course, the answer is no so President Obama and Secretary Duncan were there to speak about the Administration's plans for education reform.
  • 08/06/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Education as Opportunity"
    African Americans have always seen education as a key to life and freedom. In his autobiography Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, Frederick Douglass taught us that to educate a man is to "forever unfit him to be a slave," but to deny a person education is to "[shut him or her] up in mental darkness." Douglass said that when his former master ordered his wife to stop teaching Douglass to read, he felt he was being treated "as though I were a brute."
  • 07/30/10
    Child Watch® Column: Listening to Shirley Sherrod
    By now much of the nation has followed the story of former U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) official Shirley Sherrod, who was forced to resign from her post earlier this month after dishonestly being accused of racism in a March speech, only to be vindicated as soon as someone took the time to get a copy of what she actually said and allow the truth to come to light. But for those people who know Shirley and her husband, civil rights leader Charles Sherrod, the fact that the smears on her character were outrageous and false was never in doubt.
  • 07/23/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Abyssinian Development Corporation: Creating Community Change"
    ADC's mission is to "increase the availability of quality housing to people of diverse incomes; enhance the delivery of social services, particularly to the homeless, elderly, families, and children; foster economic revitalization; enhance educational and developmental opportunities for youth; and build community capacity through civic engagement."
  • 07/16/10
    Child Watch® Column: The Importance of Healthy Communities for Boys of Color
    A new report was released in June that sheds a sobering light on how many Black and Latino boys grow up in communities that are, in a number of ways, dangerous to their health. Called "Healthy Communities Matter: The Importance of Place to the Health of Boys of Color," the report contained contributions from scholars and researchers at the RAND Corporation, PolicyLink, the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice at Harvard Law School, and the Center for Nonviolence and Social Justice and the Department of Emergency Medicine at Drexel University. It was funded by the California Endowment. Some of its data and best practices focus on California but the lessons learned apply to communities across the country.
  • 07/09/10
    Child Watch® Column: CDF Freedom Schools® National Days of Social Action
    Service is a key part of the CDF Freedom Schools experience, and every year sites across the country participate in coordinated National Days of Social Action. This year's National Days of Social Action are focused on ensuring every child a Healthy Start in life and access to affordable, seamless, and comprehensive health and mental health coverage.
  • 07/02/10
    Child Watch® Column: The Oil Spill's Impact
    Katrina changed and damaged lives and livelihoods all around the Gulf region, many forever, including many of the same communities that are now dealing with the aftermath of the oil spill. This new crisis is leaving numerous families in these already vulnerable and fragile communities even more hopeless.
  • 07/02/10
    Child Watch® Column: The Oil Spill's Impact
    Katrina changed and damaged lives and livelihoods all around the Gulf region, many forever, including many of the same communities that are now dealing with the aftermath of the oil spill. This new crisis is leaving numerous families in these already vulnerable and fragile communities even more hopeless.
  • 06/25/10
    Child Watch® Column: Honoring Our Legacies
    Thousands of people who never had the privilege of meeting Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in person visit Atlanta every year to walk along Auburn Avenue, step inside the Heritage Sanctuary at Ebenezer Baptist Church, and tour the house at 501 Auburn where Dr. King was born. When they do, for a little while they have the chance to feel as if they were walking in Dr. King's footsteps.
  • 06/18/10
    Child Watch® Column: Expanding the Child Health Safety Net
    The landmark health reform legislation – The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 - signed by President Obama in March guarantees access to health coverage for 32 million people in America, including more than 95% of all children.
  • 06/11/10
    Child Watch® Column: The Living Skills Fifth Grade Semester: A Vision for Fighting Child Obesity
    My remarkable friend Szekely is now focusing on a new target audience: our nation's children. She is adding her extraordinary mind, energy, and voice to the chorus of those concerned about America's child obesity problem. Together with Dr. David Kessler, former FDA Commissioner and now Professor of Pediatrics and Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, she is promoting a pilot program they hope will help educate schoolchildren on the importance of healthy lifestyles.
  • 06/04/10
    Child Watch® Column: University of Notre Dame Valedictorian Katie Washington: A Terrific Role Model
    As colleges and universities across the country celebrated their students' accomplishments this commencement season, the news about the top student at the University of Notre Dame was especially inspiring for me. Twenty-one-year-old Katie Washington from Gary, Indiana made history as Notre Dame's first Black valedictorian. Katie was a biological sciences major with a minor in Catholic social teaching who earned a perfect 4.0 grade point average.
  • 05/28/10
    Child Watch® Column: More Threats to School Diversity
    The new health reform law also established a number of important prevention initiatives, including the Early Childhood Home Visiting Program. Early childhood home visiting programs provide voluntary, in-home services to families with young children beginning prenatally and going up to kindergarten entry age.
  • 05/21/10
    Child Watch® Column: Home Visiting Programs: Urgently Needed Help for Young Children and Families
    The new health reform law also established a number of important prevention initiatives, including the Early Childhood Home Visiting Program. Early childhood home visiting programs provide voluntary, in-home services to families with young children beginning prenatally and going up to kindergarten entry age.
  • 05/14/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Beyond the Backpack": Dora the Explorer Helps Prepare Children to Start School
    Is every child in your community ready to start school? This may seem like a strange question to families still finishing up their plans for summer vacation. But in reality, it's never too soon to start making sure children are prepared for their first day of school.
  • 05/07/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Dr. Elliott “Dad” Mason, Sr.: A Great Prayer Warrior"
    Dr. Mason preached his first sermon at age 16—the same year he entered Dillard University, where he was honored three years in a row as the top student in religion and philosophy. He received a second bachelor's degree in divinity from the Oberlin Graduate School of Theology, where he also ranked first in his class.
  • 04/30/10
    Child Watch® Column: "The Playground Jail"
    Adults often start conversations with children by asking them what they want to be when they grow up. We tell them to dream big, and encourage them by giving them pretend doctor's kits, fancy dress-up clothes, and other toys that let them imitate adult life.
  • 04/20/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Dr. Dorothy Height—Extraordinary Leader, Lantern, and Role Model"
    The brilliant Dr. Height was a lantern and role model for millions of women and a long haul social change agent blessed with uncommon commitment and talent. Her fingerprints are quietly embedded in many of the transforming events of the last seven decades as Blacks, women, and children pushed open and walked through previously closed doors of opportunity.
  • 04/16/10
    Child Watch® Column: "A Call for Education Equity"
    Title I was created "to ensure all children a fair and equal opportunity to obtain a high-quality education." However, the formula for distributing Title I funds is stacked against the very children it was most intended to help.
  • 04/09/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Remembering Jaime Escalante"
    When Jaime Escalante died of cancer on March 30, we lost a pioneering teacher who changed people's ideas of what children are capable of learning. Many people know about Escalante's work from the popular movie "Stand and Deliver," which depicted his success teaching Advanced Placement (AP) calculus classes to students at East Los Angeles's Garfield High School.
  • 04/02/10
    Child Watch® Column: "The Dangerous Drift Back Towards Segregated Schools"
    Two recent decisions by school boards in North Carolina are local signs of a troubling national trend towards resegregation in public schools. In New Hanover County, which includes Wilmington, parents and advocates spent much of last year debating a new middle school redistricting plan that would focus on "neighborhood schools," essentially resegregating the schools by race and economic class because our neighborhoods look that way.
  • 03/26/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Haiti's Restavèk Children: The Child Servitude Crisis"
    The recent earthquake in Haiti gave the rest of the world a glimpse of a form of child suffering that often goes unseen. When a group of American missionaries were accused of child trafficking, many people were confused by the story that unfolded. How could parents have been desperate enough to agree to simply give their children away to strangers? Sadly, this wasn't just an isolated event that only happened because of the earthquake.
  • 03/19/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Fighting Childhood Obesity"
    When First Lady Michelle Obama decided to launch the "Let's Move" campaign to fight childhood obesity, she brought much needed attention to a crisis facing millions of children. It's a special concern for children of color because new research shows Black and Hispanic children are disproportionally at risk for nearly a dozen factors that increase their chances to be obese.
  • 03/12/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Juvenile Justice Reform: Making the “Missouri Model” an American Model"
    The state of Missouri has created a juvenile justice system that has proved so successful over the last thirty years it's known as the "Missouri Miracle." A number of practices combine to make Missouri's system unique: It's primarily made up of small facilities, generally designed for between ten and thirty youths, located at sites throughout the state that keep young people close to their own homes. These facilities don't look like jails with traditional cells; there are only eight isolation rooms in the entire state, which are seldom used and only for emergency situations. They feature a highly trained and educated staff working in teams with small groups of youths.
  • 03/05/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Children Need Better Protection from Abuse and Neglect"
    In January 2008, four sisters were found dead in their southeast Washington, D.C. home. The girls, ages 5, 6, 11, and 17, had been murdered by their mother, Banita Jacks, months earlier. She was recently convicted and sentenced to 120 years in prison. None of the District of Columbia's social service agencies or the police intervened to save the girls despite some alarming signs that they were in great peril.
  • 02/26/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Wrong Place, Wrong Time"
    When young Black men are the victims of violent injuries in their urban neighborhoods, what happens next? This question haunted Dr. John Rich, who was educated at Dartmouth, Duke, and Harvard, was a primary care doctor at Boston Medical Center, and was the founder of the city's Young Men's Health Clinic. In both settings he was in constant contact with young men who had been victims of violence, and of course he was deeply concerned about the physical scars he kept treating. But as a Black doctor dealing with the aftermath of violence in young Black men day after day, Dr. Rich felt a special connection with his patients and wanted to know about more than just the medical effects of the gunshot and knife wounds he was seeing.
  • 02/19/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Rosenwald Schools: Reclaiming a Legacy"
    Across the country, schoolchildren have been studying Black History Month. But many Americans know very little about a group of schools that educated hundreds of thousands of Black children and are their own key piece of Black history. From 1913 to 1932, nearly 5,000 "Rosenwald schools" were built in 15 states, mostly in rural Southern communities.
  • 02/12/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Leaving the Littlest Ones Behind"
    When people talk about the "achievement gap" at-risk children face, they often think of it in terms that apply to school-age children—but that gap can start much earlier than most people might guess. A recent report by the nonprofit, nonpartisan research group Child Trends showed that disparities actually begin appearing before children's first birthdays.
  • 02/05/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Remembering Howard Zinn"
    When Howard Zinn passed away on January 27 at age 87, the nation mourned the loss of a pioneering historian and social activist who revolutionized the way millions of Americans, especially young Americans, understand our shared history. His writings and work inspired millions of readers, but I was among the generations of students privileged to know him as a beloved teacher, mentor, and friend. His first academic job after graduate study at Columbia University was at the historically Black, all-women Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia, my alma mater.
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