Mental Health Research Data & Publications

Items 1 - 10 of 30  123Next
  • 04/03/15
    Child Watch® Column:
    "Let's Give Child Hunger a Summer Vacation"
    Many children and families eagerly look forward to the end of the school year and the carefree days of summer, playing outside in the warm sun, splashing and swimming in pools and at beaches, and gathering with family and friends for backyard barbeques. But for more than 17 million children the end of school can be the end of certainty about where and when their next meal will come. While 21.7 million children received free or reduced price lunches during the 2013-2014 school year, only 2.6 million children-12.2 percent-participated in the Summer Food Service Program. This huge participation gap suggests that nearly 9 out of 10 of the children who benefit from free or reduced price lunches during the school year may not be receiving the nourishment necessary for proper physical, cognitive, and social development during the long summer months. Hunger has no vacation.
  • 03/27/15
    Child Watch® Column:
    "Time for Justice for Children in New York"
    By Marian Wright Edelman and Melanie Hartzog
    Under New York’s juvenile justice system a child as young as seven can be arrested for a crime, and a 16-year-old is automatically charged as an adult.
  • 03/20/15
    Child Watch® Column: "Don't Leave Children Short"
    Congress is about to strike a deal that takes care of seniors and doctors but leaves low income and “at risk” children short. Congress’ annual struggle to avoid cuts in Medicare reimbursement rates so physicians will continue to give seniors the care they need is widely considered must-pass bipartisan legislation
  • 02/20/15
    Child Watch® Column: "No ESEA Bill Is Better Than One That Fails to Protect the Poorest Children"
    For fifty years Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA) has been the primary source of federal funding targeted to schools to serve poor children. Its purpose has been to raise achievement for poor children through extra support to their schools to help meet their greater educational needs. Sadly, from the beginning states didn’t keep their end of the bargain
  • 02/13/15
    Child Watch® Column: "Girls In Justice"
    I’m grateful for a powerful new book, Girls In Justice by artist Richard Ross, a follow up to his moving earlier Juvenile In Justice, which combines Ross’s photographs of girls in the juvenile justice system with interviews he gathered from over 250 detention facilities across the United States. If a picture is worth a thousand words, the deeply disturbing photographs speak volumes. Ross uses the power of photography to make visible the hidden and harsh world of girls in detention. These heartwrenching images coupled with the girls’ ages and life stories should move us to confront the cruel and unjust juvenile justice system in our nation. These girls are ours: our neighbors, our children’s classmates, our daughters and granddaughters, sisters, cousins, and nieces — and, for some young children, our mothers. Girls In Justice begs the questions—why are so many girls, especially girls of color, confined in our nation’s detention facilities, and what are we as a society going to do about it?
  • 06/20/14
    Child Watch® Column: “Inspiring Lessons from Seattle Pacific University”
    Just days before graduation a young man with a history of mental illness entered a science and engineering building on the university’s campus armed with a shotgun and more than 50 rounds of ammunition and began firing.
  • Marian Wright Edelman 07/15/11
    Child Watch® Column: "The State of America's Children"
    The Children's Defense Fund has just released a new report, The State of America's Children 2011, which paints a disturbing portrait of child needs across our country. With rampant unemployment, housing foreclosures, homelessness, hunger, and massive looming federal and state budget cuts, children's well-being is in great jeopardy. One in five children is poor and children are our nation's poorest age group.
  • Marian Wright Edelman 06/17/11
    Child Watch® Column: "Maternal Depression: Helping Mothers, Helping Children"
    Ellie Zuehlke and her husband had expected the birth of their long-awaited first child to be one of the happiest moments of their lives—until, somehow, it wasn't. Instead, Ellie experienced severe postpartum depression that left her unable to care for their newborn son. To thousands of mothers, Ellie Zuehlke's story will sound sadly familiar.
  • Marian Wright Edelman 03/05/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Children Need Better Protection from Abuse and Neglect"
    In January 2008, four sisters were found dead in their southeast Washington, D.C. home. The girls, ages 5, 6, 11, and 17, had been murdered by their mother, Banita Jacks, months earlier. She was recently convicted and sentenced to 120 years in prison. None of the District of Columbia's social service agencies or the police intervened to save the girls despite some alarming signs that they were in great peril.
  • Marian Wright Edelman 09/18/09
    Child Watch® Column: "Child Health as a Critical National Security Issue"
    In April 2005, a group of scholars at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services published a policy brief on "National Security and U.S. Child Health Policy: The Origins and Continuing Role of Medicaid and EPSDT."
Items 1 - 10 of 30  123Next