Research Library

Research Library image of kids

Child Welfare Research Data & Publications

Items 61 - 70 of 412  Previous12345678910Next
  • 09/30/10
    Relative Foster Care Licensing Waivers in the States: Policies and Possibilities
    On October 7, 2008, the Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act (Fostering Connections) was signed into law, helping to, among other things, ensure that children in foster care maintain family connections. Fostering Connections clarifies that states may waive non-safety licensing standards on a case-by-case basis in order to eliminate barriers to placing children safely with relatives in licensed homes. In an effort to provide states with critical information as they examine their licensing policies and practices, this document presents background information on licensing for relatives. It also includes an overview of IV–E reimbursement for relative foster homes and information on the current landscape of waivers of foster home licensing standards, as well as recommendations for licensing standards that can help further the goal of maintaining family connections for children in foster care.
  • 09/30/10
    Relative Foster Care Licensing Waivers in the States: Policies and Possibilities
    On October 7, 2008, the Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act (Fostering Connections) was signed into law, helping to, among other things, ensure that children in foster care maintain family connections. Fostering Connections clarifies that states may waive non-safety licensing standards on a case-by-case basis in order to eliminate barriers to placing children safely with relatives in licensed homes. In an effort to provide states with critical information as they examine their licensing policies and practices, this document presents background information on licensing for relatives. It also includes an overview of IV–E reimbursement for relative foster homes and information on the current landscape of waivers of foster home licensing standards, as well as recommendations for licensing standards that can help further the goal of maintaining family connections for children in foster care.
  • Marian Wright Edelman 09/03/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Gun Violence and Children: Have We No Shame or Respect for Child Life?"
    . The Children's Defense Fund (CDF) has documented the threat of gun violence against American children for nearly two decades since we learned in a Peter Hart Associates poll undertaken by CDF's Black Community Crusade for Children that the number one concern of Black adults and youths was gun violence. So many in both generations feared they or their children would never reach adulthood because of pervasive gun violence.
  • Marian Wright Edelman 09/03/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Gun Violence and Children: Have We No Shame or Respect for Child Life?"
    . The Children's Defense Fund (CDF) has documented the threat of gun violence against American children for nearly two decades since we learned in a Peter Hart Associates poll undertaken by CDF's Black Community Crusade for Children that the number one concern of Black adults and youths was gun violence. So many in both generations feared they or their children would never reach adulthood because of pervasive gun violence.
  • Marian Wright Edelman 08/27/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Katrina, Five Years Later"
    Five years later, for many of Katrina's children and families home is still not back to the way it was. New roadblocks keep appearing on the road to recovery. The city's resilience is still strong, but challenges remain.
  • Marian Wright Edelman 08/27/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Katrina, Five Years Later"
    Five years later, for many of Katrina's children and families home is still not back to the way it was. New roadblocks keep appearing on the road to recovery. The city's resilience is still strong, but challenges remain.
  • Marian Wright Edelman 08/20/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Children Need Emergency Help in this Deep Recession Now!"
    Children have only one childhood and it is right now. Millions of children in our nation require emergency attention in our recession ravaged economy as poverty, including extreme child poverty, hunger, and homelessness have increased, if irreparable harm is not to be inflicted on them and on our nation's future.
  • Marian Wright Edelman 08/20/10
    Child Watch® Column: "Children Need Emergency Help in this Deep Recession Now!"
    Children have only one childhood and it is right now. Millions of children in our nation require emergency attention in our recession ravaged economy as poverty, including extreme child poverty, hunger, and homelessness have increased, if irreparable harm is not to be inflicted on them and on our nation's future.
  • 06/23/10
    Sample State Legislation for Extending Care for Older Youths
    The Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act takes important steps to meet the needs of older children and young adults as they prepare to leave foster care. Beginning October 1, 2010, under the act, states have the option to amend their Title IV-E state plans to claim federal funds for young adults in foster care beyond their 18th birthday, or for those who exited foster care after age 16 to guardianship or adoption, to age 19, 20, or 21. For young adults in foster care, this extension should be used by states as additional time to identify a permanent family, and to provide the young adult with the services, supports, and skills needed to transition successfully to adulthood. This sample legislation is a tool that state policymakers, administrators and advocates can use as they advocate for and develop legislation to extend support to young adults beyond age 18 in response to Fostering Connections. It can be the basis for new legislation or help in evaluating current state laws or pending legislation.
  • 06/23/10
    Sample State Legislation for Extending Care for Older Youths
    The Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act takes important steps to meet the needs of older children and young adults as they prepare to leave foster care. Beginning October 1, 2010, under the act, states have the option to amend their Title IV-E state plans to claim federal funds for young adults in foster care beyond their 18th birthday, or for those who exited foster care after age 16 to guardianship or adoption, to age 19, 20, or 21. For young adults in foster care, this extension should be used by states as additional time to identify a permanent family, and to provide the young adult with the services, supports, and skills needed to transition successfully to adulthood. This sample legislation is a tool that state policymakers, administrators and advocates can use as they advocate for and develop legislation to extend support to young adults beyond age 18 in response to Fostering Connections. It can be the basis for new legislation or help in evaluating current state laws or pending legislation.
Items 61 - 70 of 412  Previous12345678910Next