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Child Health Research Data & Publications

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  • 10/01/09
    Children's Health Coverage State Fact Sheets
    These factsheets provide basic stats and rankings regarding children's health coverage in each state including data on the uninsured, those enrolled in Medicaid and CHIP, income eligibility and enrollment procedures.
  • Marian Wright Edelman 09/25/09
    Child Watch® Column: "A Child's Race Against a Deadly Disease"
    Two-year-old Case Hogan is a bright, happy child with a sunshine smile who is in a desperate race against a degenerative disease that is causing the gradual deterioration of his body. A medical diagnosis revealed that Case has Hunters Syndrome, also known as MPS II.
  • Marian Wright Edelman 09/25/09
    Child Watch® Column: "A Child's Race Against a Deadly Disease"
    Two-year-old Case Hogan is a bright, happy child with a sunshine smile who is in a desperate race against a degenerative disease that is causing the gradual deterioration of his body. A medical diagnosis revealed that Case has Hunters Syndrome, also known as MPS II.
  • Marian Wright Edelman 09/18/09
    Child Watch® Column: "Child Health as a Critical National Security Issue"
    In April 2005, a group of scholars at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services published a policy brief on "National Security and U.S. Child Health Policy: The Origins and Continuing Role of Medicaid and EPSDT."
  • Marian Wright Edelman 09/18/09
    Child Watch® Column: "Child Health as a Critical National Security Issue"
    In April 2005, a group of scholars at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services published a policy brief on "National Security and U.S. Child Health Policy: The Origins and Continuing Role of Medicaid and EPSDT."
  • 09/17/09
    Without Improvements Health Reform Could Leave Millions of Children Worse Off
    Health reform is taking shape in a way that could leave millions of children worse–rather than better–off at the same time that insurance companies and drug companies stand to make billions in additional profits. Under the current health proposals, millions of children could face higher costs for health coverage and have fewer benefits. Health care reform is complicated, but ensuring that children have access to the health care they need to grow up healthy is not. This factsheet details the three elements that would make it simple for all children to enroll in affordable and comprehensive health coverage, no matter what type of health care system Congress decides to implement.
  • 09/17/09
    Without Improvements Health Reform Could Leave Millions of Children Worse Off
    Health reform is taking shape in a way that could leave millions of children worse–rather than better–off at the same time that insurance companies and drug companies stand to make billions in additional profits. Under the current health proposals, millions of children could face higher costs for health coverage and have fewer benefits. Health care reform is complicated, but ensuring that children have access to the health care they need to grow up healthy is not. This factsheet details the three elements that would make it simple for all children to enroll in affordable and comprehensive health coverage, no matter what type of health care system Congress decides to implement.
  • Marian Wright Edelman 08/21/09
    Child Watch® Column: "The Economic Costs of Uninsured Children"
    In June, Rice University's James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy released "The Economic Impact of Uninsured Children on America," a new report whose bottom line is that extending health insurance coverage to all children in the United States would be relatively inexpensive compared to the cost of letting children remain uninsured and would yield economic benefits that are greater than the costs.
  • Marian Wright Edelman 08/21/09
    Child Watch® Column: "The Economic Costs of Uninsured Children"
    In June, Rice University's James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy released "The Economic Impact of Uninsured Children on America," a new report whose bottom line is that extending health insurance coverage to all children in the United States would be relatively inexpensive compared to the cost of letting children remain uninsured and would yield economic benefits that are greater than the costs.
  • Marian Wright Edelman 08/14/09
    Child Watch® Column: "Life and Death and Child Health Reform"
    As a child, Devante Johnson's future seemed to be full of promise. His mother, Tamika Scott, worked hard, managing to raise three boys while pursuing a career, buying a house and completing a college degree. But as we reported two years ago, her family's middle class security crumbled when her doctors told her she had Multiple Sclerosis and strongly urged her to leave her job because the stress of work would make her condition worse. With the dramatic loss of income and insurance, everything she was building began to slip away as she cashed in stocks and used money from her retirement fund to pay bills. Fifteen months later, her problems worsened. Her oldest son, Devante, then 10, was diagnosed with advanced kidney cancer.
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